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Exterior wall angles in at rim joist. How to compensate before cladding?

Exterior wall angles in at rim joist. How to compensate before cladding?

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  #1  
Old 06-28-17, 11:40 AM
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Exterior wall angles in at rim joist. How to compensate before cladding?

Hello,

The sill plate and bottom of my rim joist sit about 1/2" out of plumb with the plane of the exterior wall studs.
This creates a problem because, if I nail the sheathing to the rim joist, then the bottom of my sheathing gets pulled inward and out of plumb relative to the rest of the wall. If I try to keep the sheathing plumb, then I have a gap behind the bottom part of the sheathing. Please see sketch below:
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My current thinking is that I could remove the bottom 20" of the exterior sheathing. That's easier than it sounds, because the bottom 20" is covered by separate sheets of pressure treated plywood fastened by screws (we had a lot of moisture damage in the old sheathing that I replaced). I'd use some sort of shims to keep the sheathing plumb. I'd also staple screening on the bottom to keep the bugs out. In order to provide a firm foundation for the PVC band-board that will be attached, I'd imagine I'd use an awful lot of shims.
  • Does that sound like a reasonable plan?
  • Do you have a better plan?
  • What should I use for shims? I'm thinking composite, but they're pretty small.
  • What am I not considering?


By the way, the exterior walls are not like this on all sides of the house. On one side of the house, the 2x4 studs sit 1/2" behind the face of the rim joist, so the sheathing sits nicely on top. With that, the exterior face of the sheathing is on the same plane as the face of the rim-joist and the sheathing does not cover the rim joist. But, the side I'm working on now is my current "problem child".

Thanks in advance.
 

Last edited by SturdyNail; 06-28-17 at 11:47 AM. Reason: minor edit
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  #2  
Old 06-28-17, 02:40 PM
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That's a lot of work to go to. I would probably just use shims applied to the surface of the sheathing to hold the band board plumb. A little foam backer rod and PL would fill any gaps behind the sheathing.

I'd use tapered cedar shims, nailed in line with the studs. Keep them 1 1/2" up from the bottom edge... then rip a continuous shim for the bottom edge out of a piece of 2x4.... it will probably be tapered.
 
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Old 06-28-17, 07:14 PM
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Thanks for your reply @XSleeper.
Would you be concerned with potential for moisture getting trapped between the band board and the sheathing?
Also, the band board is very close to grade. That's why I'm using PVC. So, it makes me wonder if the continuous shim you described would be susceptible to being a constantly damp food source for ants etc...
 
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Old 06-28-17, 07:29 PM
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Only if it below grade. You could use treated wood if you think it will get splashed. And put a z-flashing over the top of the band board, taped to the sheathing. WRB laps over that.

I would question why the grade is so high in the first place. Its inviting termites when you have no way to make an inspection below the siding level.
 
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Old 06-29-17, 07:36 PM
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Thanks again @XSleeper.

The grading of my house has been a sore spot for me since we moved in over 25 years ago. I have no room to remove soil near the home and still have a positive grade. On the North side, where I'm working now, there is only 10' to my neighbor's property, so I don't have much room to work with to dig a swale or french drain. There is a large thickly rooted pine tree right on the property line. At the back of the house, I can't take the soil down any further, because I'd hit the septic tank box or the leach legs. On the south side of the house, the asphalt driveway's surface actually touches the bottom course of the existing cedar shingles (in line to replace).

I'm with you regarding the use of Z-flash over the band board and then taping the top of the Z-flash. I've done that on the sections I've done so far. I'm wondering about the WRB stopping before it has a chance to cover the seams of the sill plate and bottom of the rim joist.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 06-29-17, 08:05 PM
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If any of that sheathing or your sill plate is below grade I would recommend you look into a primer and membrane that will protect against moisture. Apply that first behind the bandboard.

If its not below grade, cut some tyvek or stucco wrap to apply to the lower 10"-12" or so. But tape and lap as aforementioned above the bandboard.
 
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Old 06-04-18, 12:14 PM
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Just came across your (excellent) diagram when searching for solutions to my issue, which is somewhat similar to yours (except that my foundation is ~1' below grade with no way to re-grade).

My plan was to replace my sill and rim joist (both have rotted out) w/ pressure treated wood, followed by pressure treated plywood over the rim joist portion. I plan to caulk the seam between the sill and concrete foundation (and also use a foam sill sealer between the plate and concrete), followed by Vycor or Ice and water shield rubberized asphalt applied over this. I also plan to Vycor over the plywood face, but am debating using a Henry Blueskin permeable membrane over the plywood face instead (all of this will be below grade). Then over all this, I have some Superseal dimpled membrane that I will secure in place. I'm going to then have a french drain that will sit ~3 feet below grade, backfilled with pea-gravel (or slightly larger). Then I'm running a surface drain that will be concreted over the top (the concrete will run flush to the side of my house, basically).

What a pain, but hopefully this will be fine for the coming years... (the existing below grade set up that was just OSB and felt lasted 10 yrs of Seattle ground water exposure, so I think mine will be a more permanent solution)
 
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Old 06-05-18, 07:06 AM
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Wow! @doctorsubie, it sounds like you're getting after it with guns a blazin' :-)

It sounds like you're doing your best to protect that rim joist and sill plate. If I'm reading your post correctly, your sill plate is still going to be below grade--with stone up against it. Is that correct?
Since you are installing the French drain, you're taking care of any water that would, otherwise, collect along the side of the foundation. Would you consider, basically, a trench along your foundation to keep all stone and/or dirt from coming in contact with the bottom of your siding? Think of it as a very long rectangular window well. You could possibly use hardscape blocks to hold back the dirt and soil.

One other detail regarding the seal between the sill plate and the concrete; I saw a Matt Risinger video in which he recommends a rubber seal rather than foam (search for "FRAMING TIP - Super Sill Sealer" on YouTube).

Good luck with your project. Looks like you've got a lot of work cut out for you!
 
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