Vinyl siding - strip old wood siding or go over it?


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Old 04-16-23, 04:02 PM
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Vinyl siding - strip old wood siding or go over it?

Hi all - See my small house, built in 1955 Boston area, This pic is 10 years old, but it's basically the same. The original solid wood siding just hates to hold paint, although it is quite solid and there is no rotting at all. I repainted 3 years ago, but already starting to fail. ANYWAYS I've kicked the can down the road long enough, it's time for new windows, gutters and a maintenance-free exterior. A friend who is a veteran of exterior siding and windows and is semi-retired recommends stripping the old siding off completely, as opposed to going over this siding. He says the trim and windows etc. will be easier to integrate and look much better. I am thinking strip, Tyvek wrap, foamboard panels then the vinyl siding on top of that Not sure if I am going vinyl clapboard, vinyl shakes or a combination of the two. I like the shake look, will have to see the cost differences. Any thoughts or advice regarding stripping this siding versus going over it or anything related to this effort is appreciated!

 
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Old 04-16-23, 04:06 PM
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Your friend is correct. It's lazy and inferior to go over it, and you will have a better final product if you take it all off. With little to no overhang you need to strip it off rather than go over it.
 
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Old 05-12-23, 07:38 AM
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OK - I have been researching this, and it looks like the best option for this climate is to strip it, Tyvek house wrap them 1" EPS unfaced foam board over that, tape the seams off of that with the proper tape then the new siding on top. Thoughts/concerns?
 

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Old 05-12-23, 11:00 AM
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EPS is white extruded "bead board" foam and it offers the least r value. Also tape doesn't like to stick to it very well because it's so porous. ISO or XPS would be a better choice.

You do realize that after adding foam and your j channels that you're adding about 2 1/4" of thickness, and your window and door trim will all appear sunken in, right? Not only mention your gable end fascia. That will need z flashing under it to shed water over the siding j channels.
 
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Old 05-12-23, 03:06 PM
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OK, THX - but I lose the R-value of the current siding when stripped, and the house wrap and new vinyl siding don't make up for It I don't think. I want a good looking job, but would like to have some kind of new insulation as we have cold winters here. I am in no rush to get it done, wanted to research all my options and pick the best one, not the cheapest as this will outlive me. What about 1/4" fan fold insulation over the sheathing? Or is fanfold combined with Tyvek? I am open to input/suggestions
 
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Old 05-12-23, 03:14 PM
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I lose the R-value of the current siding
There is no R-value in the old siding. Strip it off, install ridged insulation and new siding, that is the most reasonable option!
 
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Old 05-12-23, 03:39 PM
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Fanfold is used to give a flat surface when going over existing siding. It's r value is minimal, as is its thickness. It's not much more than a dead airspace... and a poor one at that since if cold air gets under it, it negates most of the r value.

The old siding has the r value of about R-1.2 per inch, as all wood does. So when you remove it, your total r value will drop by whatever that amount is. Bevelled siding doesn't have much r value, but it has "some". Saying it has no r value is completely wrong.
 
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Old 05-12-23, 04:02 PM
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Really getting an education on this stuff, never had to think about it before. So how can I ensure all the trim integrates nicely, but still add some insulation? If you guys were doing this to your own house, would you just strip, lay Tyvek or FanFold and then side it? The house is pretty good with heat now, it is south facing so I get the low-angle sun coming in during the day in the winter which helps keep the furnace off. The attic is insulated to the max, with 3/4 decking on top of the insulation up there.
 
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Old 05-13-23, 07:10 AM
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Are the walls of your 1955 house fully insulated? If not, then you will get a much better R value if you have insulation blown in or foamed from outside though openings in the sheathing before you install the new siding.
 
 

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