Digging post holes next to large pine trees

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Old 03-16-16, 12:52 PM
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Digging post holes next to large pine trees

I am planning on putting a fence roughly 2' in front of a line of 60 foot pines I am going to use a spud to get through the tough spots. what are the chances of me killing the trees? or causing enough damage for them to come down during a storm or something? Anyone do this with no issues ?
 
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Old 03-16-16, 04:16 PM
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Are these trees transplants or original growth? If transplants from young saplings then they most likely have no tap root and only surface roots. They are very prone to toppling in sever wind storms, especially if the soil gets soft in spring. If they are original growth or from seedlings then a tap root that goes down vertically will maintain the trees integrity even in sever weather. Some damage to the surface roots most likely won't do any major harm.
 
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Old 03-16-16, 05:06 PM
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And those roots even if cut off are going to grow back back and lift that fence.
We have no picture and can not see what your seeing.
 
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Old 03-20-16, 09:36 AM
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Although I am sure there are enough people on this help forum that know a lot about tree's, I think it would be better suited if you went to a forum about tree's and plant life... I am not sure what that forum is titled, but I am sure there is one...

I have on many occasion come across tree roots in my path of a fence line... I typically take a good look at the root and the structure of the tree before I would cut anything. If it appears to be a lifeline for the tree I wouldn't dare cut it... Instead I would cut the fence line back a few inches to a foot until I can sink that post securely. It costs more on fencing materials in the end but it is better for all involved. The last thing I would want to hear is that the tree gave out and landed on the neighbors house in the middle of the night.

Good luck with your fencing project...

Greg's Fence NJ
 
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Old 04-14-16, 01:45 AM
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I watched a video and randomly recall a pro saying if thicker than your wrist, don't cut it, but that tap root info seems key. If bought from a nursery, they might have cut the tap root to put it in the burlap bag smaller.
 
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Old 04-14-16, 01:48 AM
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edit doesn't work.

If it's only one post at the end that hits a tree, you can possibly lag bolt the fence panel to the tree trunk... I think.. as long as it doesn't kill the tree. I read copper hardware would kill the tree but doubt anybody would use that.
 
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Old 04-14-16, 01:53 AM
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still edit doesn't work.

If you can get a post 2 feet from the corner, you can probably float the fence panel a couple feet past the post. Possibly some code against this and also bolting to a tree but might be an option for some.
 
 

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