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Fence Post Installation / Concrete Pad & Cinderblock Wall

Fence Post Installation / Concrete Pad & Cinderblock Wall

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  #1  
Old 05-05-16, 09:47 AM
S
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Fence Post Installation / Concrete Pad & Cinderblock Wall

Hey Guys, First post but I've been lurking around here for a while and finally need some custom help.

I am going to extend my existing cedar fence on two sides of my house.

On one side of my property I used to have a cinderblock retaining wall. I have removed it, but did not remove the underground portions of the wall, as it appears to be fairly deep and I'd rather cover it with dirt. Next to that retaining wall is my neighbors driveway, which encumbers my property line.

I'd like to build my fence as close to the property line as possible, which means either running the fence directly on top of his pad (which he is okay with, he knows he is on my property and doesn't care if I install on the pad); or I can install it in the holes of the remaining cinderblock.

Finally I could give up about 2' of my property and dig post holes on my side of the cinderblock wall, but I'd prefer not to do this as my property on this side of the house is already fairly narrow.

I only need to install 3 posts this way. To the east and west of this section of fence will be additional fence that is installed properly with 3' posts.


Solutions:

1. Attach wood or steel fence posts directly to his concrete pad with a concrete post mount. I know this isn't typically the way you would build a fence, as it is not as strong as digging post holes. But with only 3 of my posts needing to be installed this way, will it be strong enough?

2. Attach wood or steel fence posts directly to his concrete pad, and drop a reinforcement post down the open holes in the base of the exposed cinderblock wall. Attach the posts together and hope that this is enough reinforcement to hold the fence in high winds.

3. Drop posts down the open holes in the base of the exposed cinderblock wall. These holes are only about 18" deep, so I'm afraid they wouldn't be strong enough to hold the fence. But with only 3 of my posts needing to be installed this way, will it be strong enough?

4. Core drill some 4" holes in the concrete and drop chainlink fence posts down the holes. Then attach the wood fence to these metal fence posts. If this is the preferred approach, how do I remove the dirt that is below the concrete pad to ensure that the chainlink fence posts are deep enough?

5. Cut his pad away and dig holes the old fashion way (I don't prefer to do this, because on the opposite side of my house I need to install a gate on top of my own driveway, so whatever method we pick above (likely core drilling) is what I will use on my own driveway. And I'd prefer not to cut away any of my driveway.
 
  #2  
Old 05-05-16, 09:57 AM
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So far, I vote for #3, if the frost line doesn't interfere.
 
  #3  
Old 05-05-16, 12:21 PM
T
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My suggestion is 3A - #3 with modification.

You said, "it appears to be fairly deep", which means you don't know. The first thing I'd do is find out. It seems to me that you don't have to remove the entire below-ground wall, only a fairly small portion where the fence posts will be located. This may or may not be a laborious task.

You don't say how long the fence will be and how long the wall was, so I have no sense of it.

Personally, I wouldn't do #1 or #2 unless A) I had no choice or B) I had too many nice neighbors.
 
  #4  
Old 05-06-16, 02:46 PM
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Thanks for the input so far guys.

I am in Utah so the average frost depth is about 20"

The fence will be going parallel with this section of wall. To the east the existing fence extends 70' and uses 30" post holes. To the west of the wall the fence will be extending 20' using 30" post holes, then turn south and extend 20' to where it will bump up with my house also using 30" post holes.

The only area where the post holes aren't working easily is this driveway/cinderblock wall. This is a 20' section between the fences listed above.

The fence can either be installed on the driveway side parallel to the remaining wall footers. This is my neighbors driveway that is encroaching on my property. SO putting the fence here gives me my property back and makes this side yard a full 12' wide

Putting the fence directly into the empty cinderblock makes the yard 11' wide. I am not opposed to this method.

Putting the fence on the south side of the cinderblock makes the yard 10' wide, which I am not enthused about.
 
 

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