Tips and reco for painting a new fence


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Old 05-30-16, 08:19 AM
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Tips and reco for painting a new fence

Installed a new wooden fence (HT pine panels) and I am ready to seal it / treat it. I don't intend to paint it with a different color but want to ensure that I preserve it and maybe give it a little gloss / tint.

I see a LOT of different products and steps being recommended on the internet...
Looking for tips and recommendations....specific questions:
1. since this is a new fence - do I still need to use special wood cleaner before staining.
2. If I am going to use a oil based stain - do I still need a sealer or 2-in-1 ?
3. Tips on application; I have about 90 feet of fence to paint back and front....don't think roller makes sense as it won't provide any coverage in between....so I think of using a 5inch brush.

Anything else - much appreciated.
 
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Old 05-30-16, 08:27 AM
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#1 - is it slick finished wood or rough sawn?

#2 - all exterior wood siding or deck stains also act as a sealer, no need for a separate sealer

#3 - I like to spray [and back roll] if conditions permit but otherwise a long nap roller followed by a brush to knock out runs and/or work the stain into crevices works well.
 
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Old 05-31-16, 08:48 AM
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This is PT wood, right? It need to dry out for several weeks before it can be coated. After that, I would use a deck stain. Brush or roller is fine - as Mark said, the stain just needs to be worked into the wood so spraying alone is insufficient.
 
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Old 06-03-16, 02:45 PM
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correct - Pressure treated pine...

Are there any recommendations as to the brand of the stain? I see a lot of different types and brands.
Also - is it necessary to use the special detergent to clean it ?
 
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Old 06-03-16, 02:55 PM
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I generally use a bleach/water solution to clean wood prior to staining, I'll add TSP to the mix if there is grime that also needs to be removed. While rinsing with a pressure washer makes the job easier - a garden hose will do just fine.

Like most things, the price of the stain is a good indicator of it's quality. You'll almost always find better coatings at your local paint store rather than a paint dept. What works well in one climate doesn't always preform well in another so it's always best to ask around and find out what others in your locale have success with [or not]
 
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Old 06-05-16, 08:37 AM
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sorry for multiple posts but another thing that I just thought about.....how long to wait from the last rainy day and how many days before the next rain should I do this project?
The fence is facing East and is fully exposed (no shade) so the Sun would dry the panels pretty quick but wood needs to dry inside as well and since I never worked with Pressure Treated wood - I am not sure if that dries faster or slower than regular wood.
 
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Old 06-05-16, 09:19 AM
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There really isn't a one size fits all answer for how long to wait. Generally if there is no sign of moisture in the wood it's ok to apply the stain. PT wood somewhat repels water. Most new wood will dry quicker than old weathered wood. The coating's label should state how long it needs to dry before being exposed to rain although they usually err on the side of caution.
 
 

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