Gate sagging


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Old 07-28-16, 03:17 PM
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Gate sagging

Hi all, I have a wooden gate I just built connecting the side of my house to the fence that separates my yard from the neighbors (can't get the picture to upload!).

I didn't think it through, but cemented in the posts and built the gate. Now, of course, the gate is sagging as the 4x4 bends slightly toward the weight.

The post is set slightly behind the edge of the house, so it is not up against the slab, but I am limited in how much room I have to make a counter-force attachment. I was thinking about trying to dig a hole for a 4x4 at a 30 degree angle to the top of the gate post, and connect them with a gusset plate or U-bolt, and making as big a cement base for this counter beam in the ground as possible.

Name:  Fence.jpg
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Any ideas?
 

Last edited by Alpha Crow; 07-28-16 at 04:33 PM.
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Old 07-28-16, 03:58 PM
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http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

Your pics are probably too large for the site...

Too late now, but usually a good idea to use 6x6 for gate posts.

Is there room to install a 2x6 strongback to the post? This would be attached edgewise to the post forming a sort of tee shape. Fastened through the post with long lags it might be enough to prevent the post from bending.

Another easy option is a attaching a large caster wheel to the far end of the gate to support the weight.

Your idea would probably work fine.
 
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Old 07-28-16, 04:15 PM
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Old 07-28-16, 04:36 PM
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Ok, I got it uploaded, thanks!

I could take it apart and put in a 6x6 post, but I think it would still sag just due to the cantilever effect.
 
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Old 07-28-16, 04:42 PM
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Exactly how deep is that concrete, what is its diameter and how did you prepare it?

I think your whole problem probably relates to that.
 
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Old 07-28-16, 05:39 PM
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A diagonal brace, from upper left to lower right, inside the rectangle frame would probably help. It transfers part of the load directly to the lower hinge and reduces the tendency to sag. I'd try that first.
 
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Old 07-28-16, 05:47 PM
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Looks like he already has a cable turnbuckle on it. Or maybe there is cable but no turnbuckle?

You could also epoxy an eye bolt into the foundation about 3 ft away in order to have something to anchor a guy wire to.
 
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Old 07-28-16, 08:38 PM
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There is a wire and turnbuckle on the gate itself. The problem is 100% the 4x4 bowing from the weight. I checked the swing of the gate and adjusted it at every stage of putting it together, but once I put the fence slats on, no amount of tightening would keep it from sagging the left edge into the dirt. I can see the bend in the 4x4 of about an inch at the top.

I have considered putting a bolt into the slab and using a wire or board to secure it, though I'd like it to no be a hazard.

I dug the 4x4 in about 18", hammered it down into a good seat, then filled with cement. I think that 6x6 would have held better, this soft pine 4x4 is deflecting at the top edge quit a bit.
 
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Old 07-29-16, 05:00 AM
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You say the post is bending. Maybe it is a little. I would suggest that your 18" deep concrete plug has shifted under the weight of a 60"+ wide gate. (You could take the gate off or maybe take the weight off the latch side of the gate with some shims and see if the post is still plumb, and parallel with the opposite one. My bet is that it isnt.) The guy wire (another cable and turnbuckle between two eyebolts) is your solution, imo. How would that be a hazard?
 
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Old 07-29-16, 06:38 AM
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A turnbuckle is not the same as a properly placed diagonal brace. The diagonal brace actuals shifts weight from the gate to the lower hinge point, easing the pull on the top of the post. A turnbuckle does not do this, it actually puts more stress on the top of the post.
 
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Old 07-29-16, 11:16 AM
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That's true Paul, I missed that. Without the brace all the stress is pulling on the top hinge instead of creating some compression on the bottom one.
 
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Old 07-30-16, 09:44 PM
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Is this what carbide tip was suggesting, a upper left to lower right diagonal? Is that not just putting more compression on the bottom hinge? I think that makes sense, as gravity pulls on the slats below the attachment points of the diagonal, it would transfer along the diagonal to compress the bottom hinge more.
 
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Old 07-31-16, 10:48 AM
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Braces

The type of brace/diagonal does not make that much difference. The diagonal as pictured transfers pressure to the bottom hinge via the bottom rail of the gate.

The post is planted in backfill and needs to be secured at the top to prevent leaning.
 
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Old 08-02-16, 01:36 AM
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That makes more sense. I think it's a combination of needing a better neck of concrete around the post at ground level and also using a thicker board or pre-deflecting the post to adjust for the deflection from the weight. The wire/turnbuckle is pulling more on the upper hinge and causing some bending, which, while small, increases due to the long gate.
 
 

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