How to Do a Verdi Green Paint Job

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Old 04-30-17, 10:12 AM
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How to Do a Verdi Green Paint Job

I have verdi green light fixtures around my house manufactured by SNOC Canada. These are heavy duty fixtures made of cast aluminum, much higher quality than the typical Chinese made cast aluminum fixtures, and far more expensive too.

One of those fixtures is a light on a post. Both the light fixture and the post have faded, with much of the green gone. I would like to refinish it to match the other fixtures. I tried contacting the manufacturer in Montreal to see if they could refinish it and what the cost would be, between their finishing charge and transportation both ways, it would cost more to have it refinished than to buy a new one from them!

So I am trying to find out how to refinish the post and lamp myself to match the others, but can't find any information on how to do it, online. Is there anyone that has refinished something like this that could provide detailed steps on what to do?

Here is a link to a sample verdi green item from SNOC
https://lightingoriginals.ca/collect...asketed2510_lh

Thanks,

quickcurrent
 
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Old 04-30-17, 10:30 AM
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First you need to clean them up. You can paint them with either an exterior latex enamel or oil base. Either one will do ok over cast aluminum. Spraying gives the nicest finish but a decent job can be done with a brush.
 
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Old 04-30-17, 07:03 PM
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Verdi green is not a solid color, that is the difficult part. If you look closely at the image, it mocks a weathered look. I think it is painted black first, then somehow a dark green but only partly over the black, but I am not sure if those are the colors exactly or how to apply the second color to get the effect.

Brush or spray painting I have no trouble with at all, and with cleaning neither, it's the verdi green effect that baffles me. :-(

If you look at the color palette and click on the verde green you can see the striations in the paint. Looking at that it appears that it may even be a green underneath and a black partly over top! How to achieve that effect is what I'd like to learn to do. :-)
 
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Old 04-30-17, 07:43 PM
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Experiment on another aluminum surface. Try green on black with the green wiped off before it dries then black on green and do the same. See which looks best.
Painters can tell you the best odds for successful job and the best kind of paint to try first.
 
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Old 05-01-17, 04:38 AM
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I took a second look at the pic and now see it isn't a solid color

It will require a faux painting technique to achieve an exact match, not sure it would be worth the effort. Basically you'd apply a base coat and then either mix the top coat with a glaze or blot some of the top coat off to reveal some of the base coat. You'd then need to sand lightly and apply a clear coat. These types of coatings may not hold up long term when exposed to the elements.
 
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Old 05-01-17, 08:00 PM
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Thanks, solid colors are no concern for me, I've done lots of painting of all sorts, just not special effects. This is complicated because of the color matching plus the special touch, those are the challenges I see. I think it would be great if I could get it somewhere close.

What would be the best approach as far as removing some of the second color, using a brush or a rag, or perhaps a piece of sea foam? Or just brushing on enough to get the effect in the first place, i.e. not do full coverage?

I agree a durable, ultraviolet light resistant clear coat may be in order to avoid doing this often. I don't know if they used that in the original paint, but I've had it for close to thirty years! It's been fading gradually and very slowly, each year it gets a little more washed out!
 
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Old 05-02-17, 05:07 AM
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While I learned a lot of faux painting techniques as an apprentice 45 yrs ago, I've never done much of it. I'd experiment with removing some of the 2nd coat by blotting it off with a rag or sponge. If you use a glaze [we used to make our own from varnish and paint] you'd want to spray it on.

Hopefully you'll be able to get advice from someone that is well versed in faux painting
 
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Old 06-08-17, 01:12 PM
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Found a procedure to do verdisgreen that might be of interest to anyone interested in this process:

Verdisgris Finish

1. Thoroughly clean item to be painted.

2. Spray paint with Rustoleum Seasside Gloss paint and let dry overnight.

3. Brush on black paint; wipe off with a damp paper towel to reveal amount of base coat desired, and let dry overnight.

4. Finish with clear coat Rustoleum, and let dry overnight.
 
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