Vinyl Fence 6ft privacy solid


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Old 01-19-19, 03:21 PM
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Vinyl Fence 6ft privacy solid

I hired someone to install a 6 ft vinyl fence thats solid and the panels insert into the post. Why is my fence leaning it seemed they used about 1 bag of cement for each post. It did rain really hard after they finished the second side the first side was done with about 1 day of no rain but it is also leaning over just not as bad. I spent alot of money on this fence and im now in a panic. I am concerned as it appeared they didnt know much about vinyl when they installed it but brought samples and all when i got the estimate and choose this fence each side is about 190 ft long.
 
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Old 01-19-19, 03:29 PM
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First, was it installed by a professional fence installer? If so they are responsible to fix it right. Second, do you have a prevailing wind coming causing the fence to lean? And third what are the soil conditions and how far did the post go into the ground. Also a solid fence is very susceptible to wind. Using cement does not mean it will hold the post. The deepness of then post in the ground is what counts. Think of a telephone pole. What you see is about two thirds of the pole above ground.
 
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Old 01-19-19, 05:24 PM
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I hired someone
That means the next step is to get them back out to fix their work.
 
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Old 01-20-19, 04:53 AM
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A new fence should be straight. If it started leaning almost immediately I would get the installers back to fix their work.
 
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Old 01-22-19, 07:08 AM
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Yes the ground was still very wet from the rain the prior day. I told him about the fence and he came out to look at it. Said he will try to straighten it up. However i should contact my homeowners insurance to file a claim for storm damage as thats what it is. Im not going to do that as it will increase my rates. Im trying to work with him but it dont appear he wants to install this correctly. So ill be hiring someone to come fix it properly. From my understanding he should not have poured concrete he should of waited for it to dry out some as the concrete didnot have time to setup befor the next rain. And the wind and rain we had the next day was nothing to strong not a storm by anymeans. Pluse my neighbor both have huge shops build on the lots that blocl a good amount of the wind hitting the fence.
 
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Old 01-22-19, 08:34 AM
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i should contact my homeowners insurance to file a claim for storm damage
Improper installation is not a cause for filing a claim, that will haunt you for years!

I would be looking at how deep the posts were set, wet ground is normal and not necessarily the reason for it to have failed.

I'll bet they were simply not installed correctly and you are just seeing the failure early!
 
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Old 01-22-19, 08:35 AM
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Sounds like he is real good at bs'ing you.

If he used 1 bag of concrete per post, that is your problem. I would look up your fence installation instructions and see what the PROPER method and size of hole was. Usually a 5" post needs a 12" diameter hole. The depth of the post also resists wind, usually 30" or so.

A shallow post that is not properly grouted with concrete will lean in a wind. I'd be out there digging around a post to investigate where he screwed up, because I'd bet money he did a poor job of installing, such as by maybe only installing concrete at the surface... making a pivot point for the fence when the wind blows.
 
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Old 01-22-19, 08:42 AM
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I wouldn't consider filing an insurance claim and certainly if it wasn't a named storm. Here the mountains get very high winds pretty regularly. It is normal weather and you construct accordingly.

Yes, properly anchoring the posts is the core of a good fence installation. There are many different methods that work. The installer just needs to do it properly based on the site, soil conditions and fence design.
 
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Old 01-22-19, 05:04 PM
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Did he brace the fence off for a couple of days after he poured the cement? I don't begin installing the actual fence until the posts have set up in the concrete and have been braced to prevent movement during the cure.
 
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Old 01-23-19, 04:55 AM
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Fenxe was not braced as it os vinyl said u cant brace vinyl like wood. Concrete is in the bottom of the holes which i think where little over 24 inch deep. Then dirt ontop of it however not filled with dort caise most the hole still have a few inch of depth to them id say about a foot or so of cement. There is about 55 or 60 post total and used about 1.5 pallete of 50 lb bags appear to be 50 lb not 80 looked like smaller bags. Concrete does not come to the top of the hole nor os it poured at the surface it in the bottom. Also the post and panels went up at the same time from my understanding you install a post insert the panel then install the next post so on.
 
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Old 01-23-19, 05:11 AM
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It sounds like they got impatient. Normally, if using concrete, you'd place the posts and then let them set for at least a day or so for the concrete to cure before installing the fence panels.
 
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Old 01-23-19, 08:40 AM
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See the "concrete requirements" section of these sample instructions:

They recommend 140 lbs of concrete per line post... 240 per end post... 275 per gate post, because the inside of those posts must be slugged solid. And the concrete needs to surround the post completely in the ground from top to bottom. (See figure 9)

So if you have 60 posts, you would need at least 70 bags @ 60 lbs and 70 bags @ 80 lbs. Sounds like he got nowhere near that much.

Bracing posts can easily be done by making a wooden sleeve that slips over each post, then the bracing screws attach to that.

This guy was obviously NOT a fencer... he didn't do anything right the way it sounds.
 
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Old 01-27-19, 11:13 AM
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There are some contractors that just sort of bump around on a job that they are not so aware of how to do hopeful that whatever they do works.

Many folks that are shopping for work to be done on their home or their car or wherever shop around... they seek recommendations from other customers that have used the same contractor being considered for the work and they may even contact these customers and speak to them first hand... It helps to know that your contractor is in fact able to do the work and that being confirmed by people who have paid this contractor to do work and they still feel the work is of the up and up... Class A, #1 ... And nothing less.

Now, onto your fence repair... Because it is no longer a new fence job. It has turned into a repair as soon as the contractor said he will try to come back and straighten it up. Straightening it up and doing it right from the beginning are two different things.
Doing it right would be NOT installing a PVC fence set in concrete on the morning of a rainy day ... And it is also not preferred to install a Cemented solid board fence on any day that the winds are predicted to blow hard... Hard, is like anything above a 20 mph crosswind.
Okay... so now it is a fence repair.

In this fence repair the line that is in definite need is the line that is leaning... But for sure if the whole job is installed the same way they same thing will eventually happen to the rest of the fence line.

Each post will have to be dug out, both sides and all around the post... to the full depth of the fence post.
The fence post would have to be leveled up, as much as possible without the panels pulling out from the fence post.
CARE would have to be considered while moving the fence post so that the panels are not falling out of their routed holes in the posts... If that happens it would likely mean the bottom rail will drop and the pickets themselves will fall out.
This is easier if done with 2 people. But this is a consideration only if you are the one doing the repair yourself....
The cavity created between the post and the soil surrounding it would have to be back filled with concrete...

It was suggested in a previous response to your post that each post should have a certain amount of concrete per line, per corner, per gate post... Yes... I agree... having a significant amount of concrete is best over skimping it with one simple 80 or hopefully not a 60 lb bag. Many contractors skimp, saving money... But they are definitely not saving time as they is always a repair that comes back to bite them in the ____......
As far as I am concerned there is absolutely no reason to skimp if the customer is paying for the concrete. If using bags of concrete it is best to consider using at least 1 and 1/2 bags of concrete... 80 LB bags.(or two full bags minimum if using 60 lb bags).. Anything less is being cheap, skimping or a worse definition would be someone is taking the extra money and making a higher profit than is due for that work.

Case in point... If your fence is leaning, have it fixed as soon as possible.

If the fence is left for any real duration of time the wind and the rain will make the repair much harder to do. The fence will lean more and the weight of the leaning panels of fencing will surely damage the posts, the sections of materials and their upper and lower rails.
The weight of fence pulling down, will definitely damage the panels as the sun will hit the fence and the rails will MELT in a bent position.
If it is Winter season where you live the fence may stand up longer, but still the winds will eventually bring that fence down... and trust me , Plastic cracks.

So yes... Call your contractor back, have them look it over, have them fix it.

If for whatever reason they do not fix the fence have another contractor come in and do the work before more damage is done to the rest of the fence line because of the portion that is already on its way down.

To repair a out of line fence is bad enough... But if you have a repair company come in and all they have to do is dig out next to a post that does not have to be realigned with the rest of the fence the cost of that is much less than having to fix and realign and cement...

If you are lucky the contractor you have chosen will come back and do what they need to do.... Maybe it was not their fault and you have ground water that was the culprit .... But yeah, if all they used was one bag of concrete, that is a bit on the skimpier side of what is really needed to install a 6 foot high SOLID pvc fence... If it were Spaced picket it might not be as bad... But it wasn't... Solid fencing of any kind , wood , Plastic or fiberglass is like a sail in the wind... All it wants to do is move out of the way when the wind is blowing upon it.

Best of luck with this one...
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 01-11-20 at 06:35 AM.
 

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