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Questions about vinyl fence and strength factors

Questions about vinyl fence and strength factors


  #1  
Old 04-24-19, 05:09 PM
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Questions about vinyl fence and strength factors

Hi, this is my first post here and looks like a good forum for questions that I have.

I live in the Tampa Bay area of Florida and need to have an existing wood privacy fence replaced after 14 years of service. The work will have to be installed by a local professional because years ago I sustained a spinal cord injury resulting in quadriplegia. So, low maintenance and longevity are high on the list, leaving PVC as the best choice and hopefully a matte finish will be in my price range. I'm just trying to do a little homework before getting quotes.

So my questions mainly pertain to strength and factors that make one fence superior over another. I'm thinking post depth, the use of concrete to stabilize the posts and wall thickness are all important, but what about the ability of air to pass within the fence, the orientation of the PVC slats (horizontal versus vertical), the physical dimensions of the top and bottom rails, or even the slat thicknesses themselves? For instance, I'm looking at the following fences and wondering how any of that factors into the equation.

These two fences would seem like they wouldn't catch as much wind because of the ability of air to blow through. As you can see the slats are horizontal in one and vertical in the other. With a 6 foot high fence, it seems the distance between the top and bottom rail of a vertical fence is less than the distance between posts of a horizontal fence. Would that greater distance necessarily take away from the strength of the fence?




And here are two solid fences with the fence pieces both horizontal and vertical.




Sometimes I tend to over think things, but any input would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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04-25-19, 04:42 AM
Pilot Dane
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All of your fence pictures are relatively solid. The open area will allow some air to pass through but you've still got 95% the windage of a solid fence so I wouldn't let that sway my decision too much. Pick the fence you like the best.

You can't just say this one is better because the posts are closer. Fence height and post spacing is something you have to evaluate for each fence. A fence can be tall with widely spaced posts if the fence panel and posts are strong enough. Weaker panels require more closely spaced posts. Some vinyl fences have steel or aluminum reinforcing or vinyl ribs inside which allows the panels to be longer while still being strong enough.
 
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Old 04-24-19, 11:29 PM
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The post and footing are the backbone to the overall strength of the fence, get that right and it's not going to make any difference what style of fence is then installed.
 
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Old 04-25-19, 04:42 AM
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All of your fence pictures are relatively solid. The open area will allow some air to pass through but you've still got 95% the windage of a solid fence so I wouldn't let that sway my decision too much. Pick the fence you like the best.

You can't just say this one is better because the posts are closer. Fence height and post spacing is something you have to evaluate for each fence. A fence can be tall with widely spaced posts if the fence panel and posts are strong enough. Weaker panels require more closely spaced posts. Some vinyl fences have steel or aluminum reinforcing or vinyl ribs inside which allows the panels to be longer while still being strong enough.
 
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Old 04-26-19, 07:00 PM
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Thanks, Marq1, and Pilot Dane. After visiting the dealer's showroom to see the products I'm leaning toward the last fence pictured (which is least expensive) and upgrading the color and possibly getting the embossing. Warranty is 10 yrs. on materials and 1 year on labor. Pretty standard?

I need about 480' of fence and the sales rep said, with the exception of the gate posts, upgrading the other posts to .28" (at ~$3K extra) would most likely be unnecessary and a waste of money.

Has anyone purchased the embossing (or not), or color, and later regretted it for one reason or another? The wife likes the adobe color (brownish), however, the sales rep admitted it was the least popular and didn't even have a large sample piece which gives me pause and makes me wonder why...
 
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Old 04-27-19, 04:10 AM
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I used to be a big fan of vinyl siding and I put it on many of my rental houses. 10 years into it I started to realize that vinyl isn't the total wonder it was advertised to be.

For the most reliable I would stick with white. After fading it's still white. I have had a couple houses that had to be re-sided because of uneven fading of colored vinyl. All vinyl will fade and fading isn't such a bad problem as long as everything fades uniformly. The problem is when the different parts of your fence are made from different batches of material.
 
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