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Hanging a loft above garage doors - Structural question

Hanging a loft above garage doors - Structural question

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Old 01-08-17, 12:09 PM
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Hanging a loft above garage doors - Structural question

Hi, I'm attempting to follow these plans (Lumber Rack over garage door - by shopmania @ LumberJocks.com ~ woodworking community) for a storage rack above my two garage doors.

The garage is an attached part of the house that is directly under the master bedroom.

During some recent renovations, I noticed the ceiling above was composed of 2x10s (I believe every 16 inches center).

I am only going to be storing holiday decorations and some storage bins (no more than 300-500 lbs max) and I was planning on adjusting the above plans to span 3 joists with 2x6 scabs (instead of 2 joists with 2x4s).

I've read A LOT of stuff on the web about installing storage above garage doors and there seems to be a lot of mixed opinions on the dangers of structural damage (I understand conditions vary with every project and I've yet to find someone with my exact situation doing this type of construction).

I feel like this would be fine and not cause any damage to the framing but I would love some advice from professionals that will not cost me $1k (I got quotes from a couple local structural engineering firms).

Any help will be appreciated.
 
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Old 01-08-17, 12:26 PM
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The way I look at it is, from a structural point of view, hanging 500 lbs from the ceiling in that way is not much different than having 3-4 people standing in the room above. Actually less, since in this case half the load is transferred to the front wall and not carried by the joists. I don't see a problem.
 
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Old 01-08-17, 02:15 PM
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I noticed the ceiling above was composed of 2x10s (I believe every 16 inches center).
2 x 10's 16" on center are really strong, to use a technical term.
I think the main concern, and why it's advised against, is hanging things from trusses.

Many garages have 2 x 4 truss systems, 24" on center. It's not a good idea to hang any substantial weight from those, even if 16" oc.

I would just focus on the support rods and attachment to the joists and loft support.
I would use hardened steel lag bolts and don't overtighten into the wood above.
 
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Old 01-08-17, 02:21 PM
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My son in law has this above each door and it is quite substantial. I think it to be a little more sturdy than the threaded rods, but not sure. NewAge Products Performance 96 in. L x 48 in. W x 42 in. H Adjustable VersaRac Ceiling Storage Rack in Gray-40151 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 01-08-17, 02:52 PM
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The rack Larry linked to is perfect for you, I'll be getting a few

This is better than threaded rod, which takes some care to install and is not as strong as angled steel, and is cheaper.
 
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Old 01-08-17, 03:57 PM
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Thanks for the comments.

Would you recommend 5/16" bolts? The plans do not specify. Would stainless be the way to go?

They do specify 6" in length though, all I have to get through is 1/4" sheetrock and the 2x6. Would 6" be overkill?

My only issue with the rack in the link is height. I only have about 32" of clearance... Otherwise, this would be perfect.
 
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Old 01-08-17, 04:23 PM
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The rack in link is adjustable in height, as low as 18", or adjustable to 27" to 42" by adding/doubling up the corner angles.

I looked at instructions briefly and they focus pretty good on how to adjust height.

It's also adjustable from 6 to 8' wide.
 
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Old 01-08-17, 05:37 PM
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Oh yeah, you're right. I do like the thought of using this as opposed to the threaded rod.

It looks like you could screw it into the 4' scab? What about having all the weight on the joists though (as opposed to half on the front wall).

What about size of lags? 5/16? 6"?

Thanks.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 05:33 AM
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6" lags are overkill. 5/16" diameter is fine. You don't want to degrade the 2x6 by such a long bolt. I would use 3" lags in more than one hole. You can turn the top angle to be parallel to your joists and use two holes and two bolts per each bracket. Predrill the holes with a 3/16" bit to take the pressure off the grains of the wood.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 06:18 AM
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Another option is to construct the entire rack out of 2x4's even the vertical portion, that would overall be easier to "stick" build in position.

I have a similar rack that holds all my tires and rims, there are around 8 tires/rims up there and it's rock solid!
 
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Old 01-09-17, 07:45 AM
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6" lags are overkill. 5/16" diameter is fine. You don't want to degrade the 2x6 by such a long bolt. I would use 3" lags in more than one hole. You can turn the top angle to be parallel to your joists and use two holes and two bolts per each bracket. Predrill the holes with a 3/16" bit to take the pressure off the grains of the wood.
Thanks for the advice. I'm thinking of going with Timberlok, seems like a good choice for the job.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 03:59 PM
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Timberlok is a great idea, since they have the washered head and you can drive them with an impact driver.
 
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Old 01-09-17, 06:07 PM
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Timberlok is a great idea, since they have the washered head and you can drive them with an impact driver.
I've never used them but was reading up. A lot of people say you don't have to predrill. Any truth to that?
 
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Old 01-10-17, 04:02 AM
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The design of Timberloks don't require pre drilling. The threads are much wider than the shank and seem to drive quite well. I use them all the time, but just didn't think of this application. Good choice.
 
 

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