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Load bearing exterior wall runs parallel to to ceilling joists

Load bearing exterior wall runs parallel to to ceilling joists

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Old 10-14-17, 01:26 PM
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Load bearing exterior wall runs parallel to to ceilling joists

I bought a house a few months ago and am starting to gut it now and realized a wall that is leaning out (pulling away from the house at the top) and needs to be pulled back or re built is running parallel to the ceiling joists. As in- the roof ridge runs north to south, the long side walls of the house run north south, and the ceiling joists run north south. Was there a time when houses were regularly built like this? this house was built in the 30s-40s. My plan was to build a temporary wall inside to support the joists and hold up the roof, but with the joists running the opposite direction I dont see how thatd be possible unless someone were to build the wall outside under the rafter tails and use that to support the roof. either way this job is getting hired out now but Im curious to know how someone would tackle this?
 
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Old 10-14-17, 03:05 PM
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This really isn't something we can comment on without being there to look. But no, it does not sound normal. Your ridge will likely need to be raised (jacked) if it (and the rafters) have sunk, and if the walls are bowed, top plates might need to be winched together. Once everything is straight, the thing to do would be to install rafter ties as low as possible to the existing ceiling to prevent the walls from spreading.
 
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Old 10-16-17, 09:21 AM
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Didnt think it was normal. Seems like a crazy stupid way to build in my opinion. Especially beacause the joists would be half as long if they went the opposite way Definitely a big job. Now the trouble is finding someone with the knowledge and ability to tackle the job. Seems like most contractors around here just do new construction.
 
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Old 10-16-17, 10:13 AM
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You must have interior walls that carry the weight of the ceiling. If you have an unfinished basement, you can compare the location of walls and maybe determine which carry through.

But you are saying you have been in the attic and nothing currently connects your opposite load bearing walls?
 
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Old 10-16-17, 07:19 PM
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I haven't had great lighting up there but I am going to get up there this week now that most the ceiling is down, ill have to fight through layers of insulation to see, but that's what I am assuming based on the fact that the opposite wall is doing the same thing just not as bad. The house has a crawl space with several areas that have been supported differently throughout the years. Id like to get someone to come in with some I beams and try to support it more evenly so we dont have the settling effect that it has now (sunken areas)
 
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