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Powder actuated gun nails bending against concrete

Powder actuated gun nails bending against concrete

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  #1  
Old 04-27-18, 07:07 PM
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Powder actuated gun nails bending against concrete

I'm just starting to frame the unfinished basement of my 1970's house (hint: the concrete is well-cured). I was so excited to use my toy -- a powder actuated gun...er, I mean fastener -- to drive the bottom plates into the concrete. However, the first couple shots have not gone well (*see pictures below).

My gun...er, excuse me, fastener... is a Dewalt T1000. I'm using 2 1/2" nails so that they sink into the concrete 1" (As recommended by Dewalt) and using the #4 cartridge (Also as recommended by Dewalt, and this happens to be the largest cartridge that this tool supports.). Does anyone have any suggestions, or do I need to throw up my hands and go the tapcon route for securing the bottom plates?


 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:15 PM
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I hope you aren't using regular nails in your gun.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ramset-3...-100067384-_-N
 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:32 PM
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I have found that the stud plate must be firmly against the concrete or the nails will lift the stud plate enough to bend.
 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:34 PM
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You also need to hold it down FIRMLY with your left hand and hit it with your hammer like you mean it. No love taps.
 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:37 PM
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A three pound engineer's hammer is something to consider using. Also wedging down the stud plate.
 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:40 PM
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No, of course not. I'm dumb, but I'm not that dumb. And in case you ask, I'm not putting them in upside down.

 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:43 PM
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This is the gun with the trigger on it, so no hammer required. I'm putting the full weight of my upper torso down on the plate and gun as I drive it.
 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:50 PM
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Then you have some crappy nails or loads. I have only used Remington, Ramset, Hilti... never Dewalt. Maybe they are thinner diameter. (Bad) It really says 4 is the max? I would buy some 5's, or try different brand nails or both. And a better brand of load maybe. .22 is .22, box doesn't have to be yellow. You really need to push hard with one hand on the top of the gun or it recoils.
 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:50 PM
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All else fails go to the next stronger cartridge.
 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:54 PM
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Even if the gun isn't recommended for the stronger cartridges? From my understanding, the 5's are intended for driving the fasteners into steel.
 
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Old 04-27-18, 07:57 PM
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I don't have the manual in front of me. But if your gun won't shoot 5's I wouldn't feel safe using 4's in it either.

From what I find online, the t1000 is a single shot, hammer driven tool. Verify your model number please.
 
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Old 04-27-18, 08:13 PM
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Old 04-27-18, 08:28 PM
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Ok, my bad, it just LOOKS like a hammer driven tool.

I would not want to contradict your instructions or jeopardize your safety. I also don't want to disparage your new tool that you are excited about. But my advice would be to get a Remington 476 hammer driven tool if you want the cheapest tool that will do the job. Tried and true. I doubt you will have any problems once you get the hang of it.

Sorry. It appears you have a light duty nailer.

You also need to move about a foot away from your last hole before you try again. Nailing right next to a failed fastener will just blow up more concrete.
 
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Old 04-27-18, 09:13 PM
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But my advice would be to get a Remington 476 hammer driven tool if you want the cheapest tool that will do the job.
Agree. That has always been my go-to nailer.
 
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