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Noticed a lot of joists in my basement are not 90 degrees

Noticed a lot of joists in my basement are not 90 degrees


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Old 11-01-18, 07:24 PM
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Noticed a lot of joists in my basement are not 90 degrees

Is it a problem that I find some joists in my basement that are not perfectly 90 degrees? The house is a 1971 small ranch.

Foe example, I'm cutting a lot of foam board to insulate my rim joist and notice that some ends of the foam board I have to cut more of trapazoidal instead of 90 degrees.

I haven't had any problems from the floor above or anything, just wondering,
 
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Old 11-02-18, 01:00 AM
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Most likely just the way everything was constructed.

You state no issues, and to be honest what could you really do to correct?
 
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Old 11-02-18, 03:40 AM
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Do the joist have cross bracing? If so, no problems. If not you might want to be careful with weight distribution.
 
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Old 11-02-18, 04:54 AM
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After almost 50 years, I doubt there is much stress left in the floor joists to cause warping. However, since the joists are weakest at their midpoint, I would consider adding joist size bracing (vertically) between joists at the midpoint. Cut ends of brace parallel and for a tight fit. Offset every other brace to allow securing by end nailing or screwing. Assuming the joists are properly secured at their ends, bracing won't help there.
 
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Old 11-02-18, 06:47 AM
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some joists in my basement that are not perfectly 90 degrees?
Generally not a problem.
Wild guess- was your house built the year of or the year after a flood?

East coast you'll see lots of stick-built houses in 1972-1973 with bowed and twisted beams.
That's due to Hurricane Agnes, because lumberyards are generally close to railroads, and railroad often run parallel to creeks and rivers - so Hurricane Agnes flooded LOTS of lumber yards and lots of people built and re-built with wet wood.
 
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Old 11-02-18, 10:25 AM
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Thanks all!

On 2 sides of the house about 6 feet I'd say, from the sides there is some type of X bracing perpendicular to EVERY joist between them right across the basement. One board goes from the top of every joist to the bottom of the adjacent and one goes vise-versa.

There is also a double (I think) 2x10 (I think they're 2x10s) going all the way across the basement in the center perp to the joists.
 
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Old 11-02-18, 10:34 AM
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Are they all trending the same direction or some one way and the others the opposite?
And you say "trim" is it 1/8" or 1/2"?

Bud
 
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Old 11-02-18, 01:57 PM
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X bracing perpendicular to EVERY joist between them right across the basement.
I'd say you fine. Don't worry about.

What Hal said was interesting and could be the cause.
 
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Old 11-04-18, 10:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Norm201 View Post
I'd say you fine. Don't worry about.

What Hal said was interesting and could be the cause.
Yeah they are twisted I think upon closer inspection the other day.
 
 

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