Attaching Header With Drainage Pipe In The Way

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Old 11-05-18, 04:25 PM
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Attaching Header With Drainage Pipe In The Way

Hello there,
I am attempting to frame out a non-load bearing wall behind my bathroom vanity in order to install two medicine cabinets that are 22" wide. I am planning on cutting two studs to accommodate the width. The framing for one of the medicine cabinets will be partially blocked by a drainage pipe running vertical to the studs and this creates a challenge in regards to how to frame the header. I have electrical wiring, copper pipes and sink drainage pipes on the lower half of the wall. I have full access to the other side of this vanity wall. I'm attaching three pictures to this post one of which is an illustration on how I visualize the framing (scrutiny welcomed!). My two thoughts on how to create the header in this situation are: 1) Screw and glue (2) 2 x 4's together on their faces, notch out the diameter of the pipe and use a double stud shoe to reinforce this horizontal brace (can stud shoes be used on horizontal members?) or 2) Use just one 1.25 thick x 6 inch board on the cabinet side of the wall (the thickness of a 2 x 4 is too thick at 1.5 inches). I will be getting a permit for this work so it needs to pass an inspection. Any input is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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Last edited by PJmax; 11-05-18 at 06:36 PM. Reason: reoriented pic
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Old 11-05-18, 05:28 PM
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Firstly, remove all the drywall on that wall so that you can fur the wall and bottom plate out another 2". (Effectively making that wall equal to a 2x6 wall in thickness). Then you will have room to frame everything normally where and however you want it, because that pipe will be behind your new headers. Your headers will be 3" thick... just omit the 1/2" spacer between them and you will have 1/4" to spare. 1 1/4" + 2" = 3 1/4"... so your header needs to be 3" thick. The king and Jack studs and new sills can be 2x6.

Double check the depth of your cabinet... if it needs a full 4" wall thickness then you would need to fur the wall out 2 1/4".
 
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Old 11-05-18, 06:04 PM
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Great idea

Thanks for that thought and thinking of a bigger picture. I didn't show the door immediately to the right of that wall. Unfortunately, if I bring the wall and cabinets out another 2 inches, it gets pretty close to the path of the doorway and I need my berth and I know I'd whack my leg/hip against it on a regular basis when I get up in the middle of the night. Though my cat doesn't see a problem with the idea.

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Last edited by PJmax; 11-05-18 at 06:39 PM. Reason: reoriented pic
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Old 11-05-18, 06:41 PM
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Looks to me like the cabinet would still not be 90 degrees in front of the latch side door jamb even if you moved it forward 2". (Lay that square down on the floor to show its footprint) You could always move the door. Or get clear swing ADA offset hinges for the door so that the door moves out of the way a few more inches when it swings open.

Your only other option that does not involve furring out the wall is to move the drain pipe. You could center it between the vanity cabinets. It would then be centered between the two king studs and the headers would be to the left and right of the pipe. But this would mean the recessed cabinets would be about 8" apart.

It would take more drilling but you might also have room to move it to the far right or far left corner of the wall so that it can go around the new headers.

Thinking outside the box, this is an interior non load bearing wall, so it's possible they might make an exception and allow you to use a single member as a header. So for instance if you shimmed the entire wall out 1/4", you would have room to notch the center stud and place a single 2x6 or 2x8 or 2x10 across both openings as the header. Then frame under that.
 
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Old 11-05-18, 06:44 PM
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Open the wall...... use four 45 degree fittings or even two 90's to move the vent pipe over.
 
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Old 11-05-18, 07:16 PM
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I REALLY appreciate these quick responses. I have a plumber coming out tomorrow to estimate the work needed for the shower and tub drainage pipe reconfiguration and I'll ask about moving this pipe. If the plumber thinks that is an ugly or un-doable job, I'll ask the inspector when he comes to inspect the tub/shower plumbing work about the idea of notching the center stud for the header. Thank you both for taking the time to answer my questions.
 
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Old 11-05-18, 07:46 PM
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Since the walls are pretty much open.... it should be an easy task.
 
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