Bowed floor


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Old 12-10-18, 07:29 AM
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Bowed floor

Hi all,. Not sure if this is the right forum to ask the question, please let me know if I need to post it some where else.

In my foyer, the floor is bowed and I am wondering if this is something that I need to be concerned about . It's been like that since I bought the house 3 years ago . It seems isolated to the foyer. I am looking to replacing the existing flooring which is what sparked my question. I am including a picture, it's hard to see it but the the bow is there.

On a side note, the front door, seen in the picture, sticks quite a bit on the upper right side. Enough that we don't really use the door, thought that I need a new door but maybe it's related to the floor. I looked quickly in the basement and the joist all seem ok and run length wise of the foyer .
 
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Old 12-10-18, 09:04 AM
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I am looking to replacing the existing flooring
So how bowed is bowed?

Every type of floor has it's requirements, some flooring needs flatness more than others!

A door that sticks is probably not related to the floor but more to how it was installed!
 
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Old 12-10-18, 09:46 AM
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I am having trouble uploading the picture, it's on my phone and can't figure out how to create a link
Try this. The bow isn't too bad .e ough that it has a tile wobbly .

https://photos.app.goo.gl/WXkJK7NeCroGEqac6
 
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Old 12-10-18, 09:51 AM
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Here are instructions to include photos in your post.

If you walk over the hump does it feel solid under foot? How about the side areas of the foyer? Is the floor solid feeling there? Are you able to go down into the basement or crawl space under the foyer and get pictures of the joists & beams that support that area?
 
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Old 12-10-18, 04:23 PM
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I have added two pictures. One of the floor and the second is the joists. In both pictures I am pretty much in the same spot taking the photo.

The floor itself is solid no matter where I step,
 
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Old 12-10-18, 05:04 PM
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So back to original question, from center to either side how high is the "hump", and what type of floor are you considering?
 
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Old 12-10-18, 05:35 PM
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We aren't going to be able to tell you much since we aren't there. All you need to do is get some masons line... tie it between 2 nails in the basement and pull it as tight as you possibly can... perpendicular across the bottom of the joists. Then shim the line down equally on both ends. If you shim it down 1" on each end and it's only 1/4" somewhere, that would tell you that you have 3/4" of sag.

My guess is that the triple joists next to the stairs are bowing down under load which is making the hall appear crowned. So be sure you run the masons line across as many joists as you reasonably can. And like I said you need to pull it as tight as is humanly possible.
 
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Old 12-10-18, 07:18 PM
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I just did a rough measurement between hump and to each side of the wall. And it's 7/8 of an inch to the left side and 3/8 of an inch to the right.

Not sure what I plan on replacing the slate tile with yet . Want to make sure I don't have an issue on my hands before starting and how to remove the bow
 
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Old 12-10-18, 07:22 PM
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Thanks, if it is the triple joist. How would I go about fixing it?
 
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Old 12-10-18, 07:27 PM
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It would need to be jacked up. One or more footings added, and one or more structural adjustable columns added.

Temporary adjustable post columns could be added right on the cement floor but I suspect that they would create so much of a point load that they would exceed the psI of the concrete floor and break it. That's where the footing comes in.
 
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Old 12-11-18, 07:40 PM
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So would the columns be added to push up the sides that sag or to add a beam?

I know you aren't here to see it first hand but do you think this is my only option?
 
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Old 12-11-18, 08:43 PM
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Well we don't even know what the problem is for sure until you run string lines so don't get ahead of yourself. You could also put a string line on the side of the triple joist itself, stretched over it's entire span to get an idea if it is bowing down or not.

The columns could be installed under the tripled joists (assuming that is the epicenter other sag), then you would likely have to slowly raise them a little at a time to correct what took years to sag. (If that's even what it is). Let's say the tripled joists are 16' long... you might want to add columns (and footings) at 5.5' and 10.5' to help correct (straighten) and permanently support the sag.

Replacing the bowed triple joists with a steel beam is also an option but is SUBSTANTIALLY more complicated and far more expensive.
 
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Old 12-12-18, 04:58 AM
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In the basement picture where is the high point, to the right of the RO unit.

Which begs a question, why is an RO unit mounted below the front door?

Anyway, the joists look pretty robust, what do you have size wise and what is the span?

Is there any cracking in the tile/grout to indicate anything has sagged or does it appear this the way it was built?
 
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Old 12-12-18, 07:13 PM
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Hi, so when you are looking at the basement picture the joist to the left of the RO system is where the high point of the floor is . To the right of the RO is the stairs.

​​​​​​The joists are 2x10 that are 14' long. 16" off center

​​​​​​Previous owner put the RO in so not sure on the thought process if the placement.

I will get some Mason string up there this weekend too
 
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Old 12-27-18, 05:14 PM
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Hi all, I hope this post isn't dead. I got busy, but had a chance to run a mason line along a lot of the joists . The joist in my picture below, almost centered in the picture are 3/4 inch off the line (the RO system is in the middle of the two joists) while the ones to the sides each 1" off the line.

Thoughts?
 
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Old 12-28-18, 02:04 AM
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So back to the original question, you have some bowed joists, they are high or low by 1/4" now (1" max and 3/4" min), no mention of any flooring issues, cracking tiles or grout.

It doesn't appear to be anything more than an appearance issue, so to fix the joists you would have to replace which is quite a bit of work.

The type of replacement flooring still has not been defined but it could be shimmed up to compensate!
 
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Old 12-28-18, 07:16 AM
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Thanks, there aren't any cracked tiles or grout . I do have one tile that is wobbly . I haven't decided on the replacemrnr floor . I was originally thinking about a tile of some sort. I wanted to understand if I had a bigger issue on my hand before starting anything
 
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Old 12-28-18, 07:20 AM
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Thanks, there aren't any cracked tiles or grout . I do have one tile that is wobbly . I haven't decided on the replacemrnr floor . I was originally thinking about a tile of some sort. I wanted to understand if I had a bigger issue on my hand before starting anything
 
 

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