framing basement wall uneven edges


  #1  
Old 09-15-23, 06:08 AM
J
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framing basement wall uneven edges

Hi Everyone, I first want to say thank you for all the help you have given me so far! I am working on framing my basement, and I have a wall that will run perpendicular to an exterior wall. The basement is pretty flat except for within 2' of the back outside wall. that part is almost 1/4" different. So the studs within that 2' section need to be cut 1/4" shorter than all the others. Originally I was going to frame the wall on the ground and tilt it up, but this section makes that hard. My studs are the LSL studs because I am slow and warping has been a huge problem for me with other studs.

The main reason I want to do a tilt up is I feel like end nailing the studs through the bottom and top plates would be stronger than toe nailing? also, not sure how well my cheap air nailer will do toe nailing through LSL, I've heard that stuff is kinda hard.

another idea I had was, could I frame the section on the floor except that 2' section, then slide it into place and nudge it over with a hammer? Not sure how easy that would be forcing the top and bottom plates in that 2' section to bend with the floor... then toe nail the 1 or 2 studs in that 2' section?

as you can see, I'm probably over thinking things, but any ideas and guidance is greatly appreciated!!
 
  #2  
Old 09-15-23, 07:05 AM
P
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One thing you can do is make your wall whatever it needs to be. One end can be 1/4" taller than the other. Then with each end nailed in place it's easy to measure the length for any studs in between. Then after the wall is assembled you can stand it up... and hope it fits.

Or, you can build the wall standing in position. Toe nailing is acceptable. After all it is a non-structural wall. If you are concerned about the toe nailing, since it's just a few joists you could use joist hanger brackets for extra strength.
 
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Old 09-15-23, 08:21 AM
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I would make the wall the 1/4 inch smaller then place it in position and use 1/4 inch plywood pieces to shim it at the top where you are nailing it to the floor joists.
 
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Old 09-15-23, 10:04 AM
J
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Thanks everyone! I have one top plate in place, and was going to construct the wall, tip it up, then nail the top plate of the tilted up wall to the other top plate already hanging on ceiling (two top plates) the bottom plate will nail to concrete floor.

I was going to use this room as a quasi storm shelter with plywood on walls that’s why strength came up. If you all think toe nail is plenty strong I may just stick frame
 
  #5  
Old 09-15-23, 12:50 PM
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Toe nailing done properly makes a very strong joint. In my opinion stronger than an end nailed joint.
 
  #6  
Old 09-22-23, 09:37 AM
J
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Ok, so I did one section frame on ground, left the front 2 studs out since those were the ones that were off. I found my ground is more uneven than I thought, It did fit without forcing, however it was a lot tighter than I thought. all other sections will be stick frame. seems easier lol.
 
 

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