Install shiplap onto metal studs


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Old 10-18-23, 02:05 PM
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Install shiplap onto metal studs

Hello, I am looking to install shiplap on a wall that has drywall over metal studs. I do not know the gauge of the metal studs. Drywall is either 1/2 or 5/8. My thought was to screw in some furring strips to nail the shiplap to. Is that a good plan and if so what would be the best screws? Will the screws hold tight enough considering they will be going through drywall and then through the metal stud? Any other suggestions? I am trying to avoid using glue in case she shiplap ever comes down.
 
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Old 10-18-23, 04:16 PM
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You could rip strips of 1/2" plywood and countersink holes for your screws. Use 1 5/8" fine thread drywall screws to attach the plywood to the studs. Screw every 16" or so. Then nail your shiplap to that.
 
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Old 11-16-23, 10:15 AM
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Thanks. I have some 3/4 furring strips I can use plus the 1/2 drywall gives me 1 1/4. A 1 5/8 drywall screw will penetrate into the metal stud 3/8 of an inch. Is that enough?
 
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Old 11-16-23, 10:33 AM
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Once the screw gets in past the tapered bit at the tip it's got as much grip as it will ever have.
 
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Old 11-16-23, 10:46 AM
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that makes sense. Thanks
 
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Old 11-16-23, 02:53 PM
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When you screw on the furring strips just be careful not to strip the screws.
 
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Old 11-16-23, 03:49 PM
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Thanks. My fine drywall screws didn't seem to hold that well. i was going to buy Teks but the 1 7/16 size with the "wings" doesn't have enough threaded portion. Is there another wood to metal screw you recommend?
 
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Old 11-16-23, 03:50 PM
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If they didn't hold its because you stripped them all. You can't spin the screws. And you need to predrill and countersink the plywood. Don't expect the screw to countersink itself because will strip before the head countersink itself. That's why I suggested in post 2 that you countersink the holes for your screws.
 
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Old 11-16-23, 04:01 PM
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I see what you are saying. When the screw is trying to coutnersink itself it is putting more pressure on the hole in the metal stud and therefore stripping it.
 
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Old 11-16-23, 04:10 PM
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Its interesting because I had some trim screws and regular drywall screws. the trim screws held great. Maybe because the head is smaller and not as much of an issue not countersinking. the trim screws also looked like they had more threads
 
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Old 11-16-23, 06:50 PM
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I'd say use whatever works best, is easiest, and holds good. My method was just for using drywall screws. The tek screws with the wafer head would work well too.
 
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Old 11-16-23, 07:20 PM
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yeah, the problem with the tek is that the 1 7/16 with the wings would not be long enough and the 2 3/4 is too long. I assume drilling the screw 1 1/2 through the metal stud isn't best.
 
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Old 11-16-23, 07:24 PM
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Don't think we are talking about the same tek screw. 1 5/8"

https://www.menards.com/main/hardwar...051-c-8935.htm
 
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Old 11-16-23, 07:32 PM
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I see. I think I need something that countersinks since the shiplap is getting installed over it, that way there are no bumps from the screw head. I'll probably use the trim screws. I didn't have to pre drill and they seemed to hold good. If I use drywall then i will be sure to drill out the countersink first
 
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Old 11-16-23, 07:34 PM
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You can countersink those heads with a spade bit, 1/8" deep. That would make them like a 1 3/4" long screw.
 
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Old 11-16-23, 07:49 PM
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I'm following you. I like those (the lath screws). So those are ok to go through wood into the thin metal stud? Actually it will go through wood, then through drywall and then the stud.
 
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Old 11-16-23, 08:12 PM
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Yep.
 
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Old 11-17-23, 07:05 AM
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I'm going to get the screws you mentioned. I noticed those have the sharp point but the box still says no pre drilling needed. These are different than "self drilling" screws with the drill point, right? Is there a reason to use one or the other? trying to educate myself
 
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Old 11-17-23, 08:10 AM
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The stud does not require predrilling. Your plywood strips will. Reason is the screw point has to be able to spin freely to pierce the metal stud. This would be true no matter what kind of screw you use, which is why I have mentioned countersinking from the start.

If you don't predrill the plywood the screw will thread into the plywood and when it hits the stud and you keep turning it will run the plywood up to the head of the screw before it is drawn tight to the stud. This would cause you to need to reverse the drill, back the screw out, push the plywood tight to the wall again and then try to drive the screw again.

It will take a short time to predrill all your plywood strips before you even go to screw the first one on. Use a bit that is the same size as the screw thread or 1 size bigger. The thread in the steel stud and the wafer head is what will draw them up tight.
 
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Old 11-17-23, 08:13 AM
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I know exactly what you are saying as that has happened when I haven't pre drilled wood in certain situations.

So are the drill point screws the same? they label those as self drilling.
 
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Old 11-17-23, 08:33 AM
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Self drilling screws have a cutting edge on the point of the screw. Good for drilling into aluminum or thicker gauge steel. The screws with the sharp point easily pierce steel studs without much effort. They spin for a bit, then start. Which is why I keep saying not to spin them. If your drill has a clutch, set it to a low torque setting.
 
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Old 11-17-23, 08:52 AM
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Yeah, when I was testing the fine threaded trim screws that is what I noticed. They didn't take long or much effort to go into the metal stud. I took it slow. I don't understand your statement below. I mean, i understand but if they are designed to spin in the metal to get started then how do you not spin them (your second comment below). Does that just go back to pre drilling the wood?

They spin for a bit, then start. Which is why I keep saying not to spin them.
 
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Old 11-17-23, 08:59 AM
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Once they get tight if you continue to spin them they are stripped. If the screw only pierces the stud by 3/8" you have about .01 seconds to take your finger off the trigger if you are drilling at full speed. If it spins even one rotation after its tight, its stripped. That's the nature of steel studs. Taking it slow is good until you get a feel for it.
 
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Old 11-17-23, 09:05 AM
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got it. I'll just tighten until the head is flush with the wood and it feels tight, nice and slow. It's not once of those situations where you say, one more spin will do the trick. LOL
 
 

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