Wood Filler, MDF, Painting

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Old 01-04-17, 08:47 AM
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Wood Filler, MDF, Painting

I'm building a subwoofer enclosure for my vehicle with double baffle and was cutting a 1/2" channel to recess the speaker grill and the router skipped around when I first turned it on, thereby chewing up the surface of my panel. I was able to fill the gouge with wood filler, but am questioning how durable it is going to be. It doesn't need to be ultra strong, but it is right on the edge of my channel cut. That and I will be covering it in automotive carpet using spray adhesive. Questions are:

1) Will the wood filler hold up over time (the enclosure will be subjected to extreme temperature swings and humidity)?

2) Will the spray adhesive adhere to the wood filler?

3) Is there a certain type of filler that works better with MDF?

4) Is there an alternative? E.g., I've seen Youtube videos of cabinet builders using bondo.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 09:31 AM
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I certainly don't see the filler holding up as a structural element and I would think the vibration of a subwoofer would be problematic as well.
 
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Old 01-04-17, 09:43 AM
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The adhesive should adhere to the filler although those areas might be extra thirsty and require a 2nd coat of adhesive. Since the filler is covered by either carpet or the speaker I wouldn't be overly concerned about it failing [those should help to hold it in place]
 
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Old 01-16-17, 02:15 PM
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Okay, I've applied two coats of primer to my baffle and lightly sanded it smooth with #400 paper. What should I use to remove the residue? Mineral spirits, denatured alcohol, plain water?
 
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Old 01-16-17, 02:22 PM
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A damp rag followed by a clean, dry cloth.
 
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Old 01-16-17, 03:11 PM
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If you use a solvent that is compatible to the finish you don't have to make sure it's perfectly dry before you apply the paint; rag damp with water for latex, mineral spirits for oil base, etc.

No more than 400 grit will do you might get by with just a dry clean rag.
 
 

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