Achieving this wood shine ?

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-30-17, 02:44 PM
WRDIY's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 678
Received 4 Votes on 3 Posts
Achieving this wood shine ?

Name:  01c6f9b1-bf49-4cb7-9a57-17fafe933645.jpg
Views: 757
Size:  28.2 KB
http://content.angieslist.com/2014/3...fafe933645.JPG

Is it possible to get a 2x4 to the level of shine in the picture?

I understand before applying any type of wood finish, there will be preparations (such as sanding, filling and then sanding again).

WHICH will I need to get to this level of shine:
  • Lacquer
  • Polyurethane
  • Shellac
  • Varnish

Also, to achieve a certain color, I probably would need to stain the wood first right?
 
  #2  
Old 06-30-17, 03:43 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,822
Received 359 Votes on 316 Posts
So you want to put lipstick on a pig

You would start out by sanding the 2x4 to get as smooth/flat as you can, then stain followed by multiple coats of finish [sanding between coats] You should be able to get that sheen with any of the mentioned finishes. It's possible a fine sanding and wax might be needed at the end.
 
  #3  
Old 06-30-17, 04:24 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'll just cut to the chase, a mirror finish on a floor is not nice looking IMHO.
What is the 2x4 being used for?
Lacquer is shiny; Urethane can be shiny; Shellac can produce a mirror finish with a lot of work, look up French Rub.
If it's only a few 2x4's, you might want to consider 2x4 hardwood and not studs.

The picture is probably quarter sawn white oak with a high gloss poly or oil finish. The oak pores would have been filled with a trowelable wood filler first to achieve that kind of gloss.

Lipstick on a pig... Hilarious..
 
  #4  
Old 06-30-17, 06:14 PM
WRDIY's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 678
Received 4 Votes on 3 Posts
Thanks Mark and Brian.


I am not a fan of shiny wood floors either. Porcelain or marble yes. I picked that picture because I was just curious if it is acheivable for a regular DIY project, or will it require special machines/processes.

I took 4 years of wood shop in high school about 30+ years ago. I remembered at the time, I made a treasure box. I sanded and varnished that box like 6 coats. The shine was achievable but it faded after a year. I thought in this day and age, they might have came up with something New and Improved!


An additional question:


I am creating a small shelf since I have extra 2x4s sitting around. The 2x4s have been sitting out in the backyard for a couple of years. Still in good condition from visual inspection. Should I be concern of bringing any type of infestation into the house, such as termites? Or should I just buy new 2x4s?
 
  #5  
Old 06-30-17, 07:17 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 13,792
Received 252 Votes on 220 Posts
Google "pourable epoxy" I have used it on a couple of wood vanities and have had great results. I suspect that is what that floor is as well, but would be quite a task to do an entire floor!
 
  #6  
Old 06-30-17, 07:35 PM
WRDIY's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 678
Received 4 Votes on 3 Posts
Tolyn Ironhand, I believe you are correct and that is what I am looking for. It is the epoxy that will produce the glass-like finish:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIGV5qugAqg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQrRVUarzPc

I am not doing it on floors although the picture shows the floor. I may apply it to a small shelf.

Did the shine fade on your vanities after a few years?

I have used a similar product for a bathtub (fiberglass) but not for wood.

Thanks
 
  #7  
Old 06-30-17, 08:24 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 13,792
Received 252 Votes on 220 Posts
No. It has stayed the same color and shine since the day I poured it. Here is a picture: Name:  Vanity.jpg
Views: 285
Size:  29.5 KB

I tried to catch the reflection of the light fixture. It is double because of the mirror. Wood is just 3/4" pine and would be similar to a 2x4
 
  #8  
Old 06-30-17, 11:58 PM
WRDIY's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 678
Received 4 Votes on 3 Posts
Yep, that is what I am looking for Tolyn! Thanks for sharing the picture and the knowledge.

Did you have to do any heavy sanding or other preparations before applying?
 
  #9  
Old 07-01-17, 03:43 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,113
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
I saw Norm do something very similar with a spreadable (?) poly? Took like 2 or 3 coats but it was deep and glossy as all get out. Never used 'em except for a bartop, but seems like thickness of pour and temp is very important.

That said TI's work is fantastic.
 
  #10  
Old 07-01-17, 05:43 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 13,792
Received 252 Votes on 220 Posts
Did you have to do any heavy sanding or other preparations before applying?
Not really. The epoxy will cover many imperfections. People even embed items in the wood before covering it. Watch some videos on how to do it and follow the directions EXACTLY. I did it in two pours, one thin one to seal the wood and fill any holes/dimples, then the final coat.

That said TI's work is fantastic.
Thank you.
 
  #11  
Old 07-01-17, 09:30 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That said TI's work is fantastic.
I agree, TI's counter looks great. I'm seriously thinking about finishing a vanity top the same.
I have some leftover/free butcher block maple and why not use it when it looks better than granite or anything I am used to installing.

People even embed items in the wood before covering it.
True, Search for Decoupage techniques. Decoupage is popular for displaying items such as pictures and documents.
 
  #12  
Old 07-01-17, 03:20 PM
WRDIY's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 678
Received 4 Votes on 3 Posts
I was only able to find the product "Table Top Epoxy" on Amazon. Weird that Lowe's or Home Depot do not carry them.

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...d=GDN8D7C6BVDC
 
  #13  
Old 07-08-17, 12:45 AM
WRDIY's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 678
Received 4 Votes on 3 Posts
I finally found it on a trip to Home Depot. In case others are looking for the same stuff:

Rust-Oleum Parks Gloss Super Glaze Finish and Preservative
Rust-Oleum Parks 1-qt. Gloss Super Glaze Finish and Preservative-241352 - The Home Depot

It is an overkill for my shelf so I will stick to the regular stuff. Basing on Tolyn sharings, I think this is the same stuff that they used in the picture that I posted or for 24 Hour Fitness aerobic rooms.

Thanks all for your help on this.
 
  #14  
Old 07-08-17, 05:51 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 13,792
Received 252 Votes on 220 Posts
Yes, the Rust-Oleum is the same stuff. Your should be able to find it in paint department of any home store. If you want to look for more online google "bar top epoxy".

FYI from Lowes: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Famowood-Gl...acquer/3366918
 
  #15  
Old 07-08-17, 06:48 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 12,001
Received 62 Votes on 51 Posts
Caution on the heavy pour-on stuff. You need to make sure the unseen surface is well sealed, otherwise you risk warpage.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: