Will this wood glue repair hold?


  #1  
Old 01-01-20, 08:28 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Utah
Posts: 338
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Will this wood glue repair hold?

So my sister in law broke one of our kitchen chairs last night, turns out it was because she was scooting on it, and because the leg got pulled outward, it just snapped one of the corner brackets in half.

I thought I may have to find a new piece of wood and drill all the correct holes in it to fix it, but figured I might as well try gluing it first. I know wood glue is strong, but I'm not sure if it will hold in this particular orientation. I glued it overnight last night with a good strong clamp. On one side, the seam is barely even visible, on the other side, you can see easily. But I'm pretty sure it's a good strong bond.

Here you can see where it cracked, going right through one of the screw holes:


Here is the other side, where you can't see the crack as well:


And here is a view of another corner bracket, not broken, so you can see how it is oriented in the chair. I'm just not sure with the screws putting pressure on the block that way if it will hold or not? Seems like about the best way to snap a wood glue joint is to put pressure on it in exactly this way lol:
 
denidenial22 voted this post useful.
  #2  
Old 01-01-20, 08:33 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 10,957
Received 725 Upvotes on 641 Posts
I would've used an epoxy like JB Weld. But if you're careful I think you'll OK. The problem with wood glue is that it will dry out and crack over the years. And if you don't introduce humidity during winter season it will accelerate that drying condition. There are better ways of repair, but what you did is a quick fix and I think is OK.
 
  #3  
Old 01-01-20, 08:48 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Utah
Posts: 338
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Ha I should have asked here before repairing it. Ok well thanks. I suppose I'll just not screw it down too tight, and then if it ever does break again I can always just go with the first option and build my own new corner bracket.
 
  #4  
Old 01-01-20, 08:55 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 10,957
Received 725 Upvotes on 641 Posts
That would be the correct solution.
 
  #5  
Old 01-01-20, 09:05 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 2,316
Received 296 Upvotes on 254 Posts
Looks like that is a break from tension.
I'd reinforce it with a pair of narrow width hose clamps
 
Attached Images  
  #6  
Old 01-01-20, 12:36 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Utah
Posts: 338
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Hm not a bad idea thanks. Yeah she is quite heavy and when she tried to scoot the chair, the leg just bent back and put too much stress on that corner bracket.
 
  #7  
Old 01-01-20, 01:44 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 2,316
Received 296 Upvotes on 254 Posts
Actually, get metal truss plates from a hardware store



Get 4 triangle plates if you can, otherwise get 2 squares and cut them into 4 triangles with a hacksaw or tin snips.
That will reinforce the edges and they'll never break again.
 
  #8  
Old 01-01-20, 02:01 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Utah
Posts: 338
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
And put them on the face of the brace? Or in top connecting it to the side rails?
 
  #9  
Old 01-01-20, 02:06 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 2,316
Received 296 Upvotes on 254 Posts
Across the seat and brace
 
Attached Images  
  #10  
Old 01-01-20, 02:16 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Utah
Posts: 338
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Ah yes of course. Thanks!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: