Looking for firewood shed ideas

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Old 02-13-16, 09:02 PM
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Looking for firewood shed ideas

I'm looking to build a firewood shed since I can't really afford to have someone else do it for me. Trouble is, my carpentry skills leave something to be desired.

I'm looking for some basic three-sided shed ideas with some step-by-step instructions. It needs to be strong enough to hold up against Montana winds. I'd like the walls to keep rain/snow out but allow some air to move through. I plan to use pallets for the flooring rather than pour a pad. I'd like to be able to store 6 or 7 cords at a time, at least.

Any suggestions would be much appreciated!
 
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Old 02-13-16, 09:49 PM
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Hi chuck,
I built mine for one cord so I'm picturing something much larger.

Any thoughts on how you want to set the walls, concrete perimeter or pads under each post? Where you are located do you have any code requirements. In some locations, a shed over a certain size requires a permit.

Have you looked at any particular styles, single slope, gable roof, gambrel?

That will get you started. Once we get an idea which direction you are headed we may be able to pull up some online plans.

Bud
 
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Old 02-13-16, 11:42 PM
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I don't own a wood burning fireplace but I have friends who either have them or have had them. One friend who now lives elsewhere had a ring that kept the wood off of the ground and it was made of metal. As for my other friend I can't say I never asked him how he stores his wood.

A neighbor of ours never stored wood in her shed but the shed only had some pressure treated wood and it had termites as a result. Later on she bought a plastic shed to replace it that looks very nice and it has a very sturdy tough plastic floor. To keep the shed from going anywhere they used metal rebar to fasten the shed to the ground. It looks nice and didn't cost much, is sturdy and best of all will never attract termites. I think a plastic shed would work great for you and you can buy them just about anywhere including Loews and Home Depot.
 
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Old 02-14-16, 04:21 AM
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I'd be concerned about using pallets for the base/floor. Some pallets can take the weight of the stacked wood better than others but all are apt to collect debris leading to rot.
 
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Old 02-15-16, 12:10 PM
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Wood Shed

A shed 8 ft deep and 16 feet wide will hold 6 cords when stacked 6 ft high. These calculations are based on full cords. Face cords will be less for firewood lengths less than 4 ft.

I would install 6 concrete post pads deep enough to get below the frost depth for your area. A post at each corner and a pair in the center. Install the posts with adequate bracing. 8 foot high in front and 6 ft high at the rear. Single pitch roof. 10 foot rafters will give some overhang at the front and rear.

I would want a concrete floor. If not concrete, then gravel. Pallets will rot and are dangerous to walk on.

Post back with questions. Others will add to my suggestions. Good luck with your project.

Tell us if this is a rural setting or an urban setting. (How important is exterior appearance?).
 

Last edited by Wirepuller38; 02-15-16 at 12:37 PM.
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Old 02-15-16, 01:55 PM
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I'm in a rural neighborhood, so appearance isn't of the utmost importance. Still, I'd rather this not be an eyesore. I've seen some well-built wood sheds that aren't pretty but neither are they ugly, and they're quite functional.

A pad would be ideal but I just can't afford that right now.
 
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Old 02-15-16, 01:59 PM
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I had in mind single slope with the corner and interior posts set in concrete.

No code requirements in my location, thankfully.
 
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Old 02-15-16, 02:14 PM
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Floor idea

Came across this elsewhere. Curious what people think about this floor idea, assuming the proper timber is used.

Show us yours! Wood shed | Page 4 | Hearth.com Forums Home
 
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Old 02-15-16, 03:36 PM
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If a wood floor doesn't have ventilation under it - rot will come sooner or later. Also the dirt/bark and everything that accumulates on a wood shed floor will also facilitate rot. If it was me, I keep the floor dirt for the time being and then pour a slab when the weather and budget allow.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 07:07 AM
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Wood Shed

Another floor option would be patio pavers.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_19183-215-10...12+x+12+pavers

Cost of these is about the same as ready mixed concrete.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 09:14 AM
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Many of the wood-floor designs I've seen thus far have approx. 1 ft of space between the floor and the ground. The floor board are spaced to allow for air flow, and the space between the floor and ground is well ventilated. Still, you raise an excellent point I've been considering. How long would even treated lumber last? Our climate is quite dry, though there's a fair amount of snow in the winter and lots of wind. Another factor is that, given the wind, I need to place this shed carefully so as to account for snow drifts and the predominant direction of precipitation.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 10:39 AM
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Is that 6-7 face cords or true cords? The size you need will be determined by the volume of the wood you need to cover. I built mine like a shed style building in WNY. I gave it a 4:12 pitch on the roof. I had many Black Locust trees on my property so I had them cut into 6X6 poles to make it a pole barn style structure. Once the poles had seasoned I built a 10X12 structure and used rough cut lumber for building material. I used 2X10s for the roof, 2X12 for the front and back plates and used 1X8 as roof sheeting. Covered the roof with painted steel. I I braced all the sides except the side where I put the wood into the shed. I did not sheet the sides but piled wood along the sides first. Piled the rest of the wood inside. The outside piles kept the snow out. I tired using pallets at first to stack the wood on but had to many varmints move in and it was difficult to walk on. Removed the pallets and placed ~6" of #2 washed stone which kept the wood dry and varmints out.
 
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Old 02-16-16, 01:16 PM
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I'm thinking full cords.

The varmint issue concerns me as well, in addition to the other issues folks have raised here with pallets or raised flooring.
 
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