Shed Foundation Advice - Southern Ontario Area

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Old 06-15-17, 12:24 PM
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Question Shed Foundation Advice - Southern Ontario Area

I am planning to build a shed foundation for a 10' x 8' Lifetime shed made out of polyethylene. It will be situated in our backyard on part of what is currently a large garden area. I live in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and our winters drop well below freezing temperatures.

I came across this project on Rona (https://www.rona.ca/en/projects/Desi...r-storage-shed) which I am using to plan things out. There are five different shed foundations listed that one can build depending on where you live.

Am I correct in choosing a foundation using concrete piers and timbers to resist the effects of the ground freezing and thawing? There aren't many companies out there willing to just make the shed foundation as it's a "small" job for them, but the one that got back to me said they use a bed of gravel with deck blocks and timber runners on top.

How deep do the concrete piers need to go below ground level? I've read that deck posts need to be a minimum of 4' deep. Does the same apply to concrete piers for the shed foundation?

From what I have read, a building permit is required for a shed larger than 10 square meters (108 square feet) or attached to an existing building or has plumbing. Our shed is 80 square feet and will be situated away from the house and no plumbing.

The other thing I know I should do is call and find out if there are any underground utilities correct?
If I am missing any other details I would appreciate it.
 
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Old 06-15-17, 05:47 PM
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Yes, in Canada, the concrete footings have to be 4' deep. I think that you can pour one at each corner & frame the rest with pressure treated wood. I wouldn't pour an entire concrete pad. It's a lot of work plus something like that might make it a permanent fixture that needs a variance. I doubt that you have to worry about underground utilities except maybe a sprinkler system.
 
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Old 06-15-17, 07:38 PM
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but the one that got back to me said they use a bed of gravel with deck blocks and timber runners on top.
If a local builder said they use skids, you might want to do the same. It will save you work and the builder must not be too concerned with heaving.
I'm in Southern Cal and we have a problem with ground heaving in my area. I'm planning a shed and plan to use gravel and 4x4 skids. I figure it will be stable enough for a shed.
If it ever does heave you could jack up a corner(s) and shim the skids.
Your required size is similar to here, 100SF and not a permanent/attached structure.
The 100SF limit and moveable allows you to place the shed closer to the property line, 3 feet around here.

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Old 08-21-17, 04:40 AM
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Right or wrong, I decided to try something different. I had my land escalated down to the clay, and then had that clay packed down. I then laid down two feet of gravel. On that gravel I built the 12x16 storehouse on three 4x10 beams. Each 4x10 beam sits on three garden patio concrete post holders, and each of those post holders sits on 4" thick 2x2 concrete tiles.

We don't seem to have two much frost heaving in this part of Canada, so my thinking was if/when the storehouse becomes un-level, I can jack it up, re-level the gravel and then lower back into place. Time will tell, but one winter later, my plumb box is bang on the mark I made last summer.
 
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Old 08-21-17, 05:23 AM
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I think that you meant excavated not escalated. Gravel is good for drainage. I wouldn't use it for a foundation.
 
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Old 08-21-17, 05:51 PM
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I do get lots of water in the area which was another reason I used the gravel. For anything bigger than what I have now I would have drilled down, but I think I'll be fine. Ask me in a few years. :-)
 
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