Garage Ventilation

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-26-17, 09:31 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,093
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
Garage Ventilation

I didn't realize this until recently, but apparently an enclosed garage requires vents in the lower wall/foundation to provide fresh outdoor air? One of the notes on my plans says the garage should be vented with 60 square inches located 6" above the floor. State is VA.
 
  #2  
Old 06-26-17, 02:50 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,112
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
That's a new one on me. I know in flood prone coastal areas you had to have vents to allow water to rush in and escape without undermining the foundation and to relieve pressure on the structure. I've been gone a while but none of the houses in my area had ventilated garages nor did the standalone garage my neighbor built around 2000.

Rules change I guess. You may want to verify with your local authority.
 
  #3  
Old 06-27-17, 08:00 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,093
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
I'll definitely verify. I'm submitting the drawings to the county tomorrow. Also wanted to ask...if there is a note explicitly stating something on the drawing, do I have to follow it? Specifically, the builder stated on the drawing that I would be using a 60-minute fire rated entry door, but code in my county is 20 minutes. Plus I imagine a 20 minute door is less expensive and more readily available (that's all I see at HD).
 
  #4  
Old 06-27-17, 12:25 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 965
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
I think there's an exception in the code for single family residential that allows a 20 minute door between the garage and living space. It has to be self-closing and self-latching. But verify with the building official. It seems to me the old UBC had a 1 hour requirement.

I've never heard of a vent in the garage wall either. On one hand, it makes a lot of sense if you have a venting up high too because you'll get a stack effect going and have very good ventilation. On the other hand, you'll also have great ventilation to fuel a fire.
 
  #5  
Old 06-27-17, 12:53 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,093
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
Oh yeah, self-closing was another question I had. I've seen they make self-closing hinges? That is good, because no way in hell I'm going to have some large commercial closer attached to the top of my door.
 
  #6  
Old 06-27-17, 01:18 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 965
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
I had spring hinges on my door in the house before this. I had just one hinge that was a spring hinge, but it was a commercial grade hinge. The only down-side was that the door isn't dampened like it is with a conventional closer (you can buy residential closers) and it slams. Depending on how by-the-book your building official is, be sure the hinges are UL listed.
 
  #7  
Old 06-27-17, 02:25 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 618
Received 42 Votes on 33 Posts
Pretty common for garages here, it's a safety thing. Car or anything that runs on fuel in garage, leaks fuel, nowhere for the fumes to go. Add in a water heater or anything else that has a pilot and you have the makings of a bad adventure.
 
  #8  
Old 06-27-17, 02:49 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 965
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
That makes sense Ron53! I believe code says anything capable of generating a glow or flame has to be a minimum of 18" above the floor. Around here, we can't have anything with water in a garage unless the garage is heated, which is rare. Come winter, the garage is a huge walk-in freezer
 
  #9  
Old 06-29-17, 03:00 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,093
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
Well, IMO, a lot of these regulations are a little overkill to account for all the idiots in the world. One person ruins it for all sort of thing. I don't know anybody with a garage door that closes on its own. I'll do whatever to pass inspection (I have no choice), but I can't say I will leave things in place once the inspector walks away.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: