Building a shed foundation for old plastic shed

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-14-17, 11:55 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Building a shed foundation for old plastic shed

Hello,

I purchased a home and the previous homeowner left behind a Keter Infinity 86 plastic shed. We don't want to get rid of it, but the problem is that they did not build a foundation for the shed, and it sits on our bare grass lawn. When the grass grows, the doors are impossible to open. The shed has also started to sink into the soil a bit, adding to the difficulty.

What should we do? Can I partially or fully disassemble the unit to reconstruct on a wood foundation? Or is it possible to move the unit out of the way to build a foundation and move back?

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-14-17, 02:41 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Quite a few options. Around here a lot of them are just up on cinderblocks. Usually just spaced out evenly and in the corners as needed per weight.Shimmed as needed. Even if you put wood 4x4s under it like a sled you'll still want some concrete between the wood and the ground. As for getting it up I'd just get a few people over to tilt the front up and then the back (an 8x6 plastic shed can't be all that heavy). Or you could just use a couple of people with a board and pivot point to pry it up.
Think about what you'll be hauling/rolling in and out of it also to give you an idea of your desired height.
 
  #3  
Old 09-14-17, 07:53 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I believe this thing weighs about 300lbs. I might disassemble enough to make moving easier. I'm thinking I want to build a basic base out of 2x4's with a plywood top. I don't see a reason to go with much more than that. Questioning whether I need to "float it" with some deck blocks on the corners, or if I just keep the base on the grass. I'm not rolling a mower or anything into it.
 
  #4  
Old 09-14-17, 08:06 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,226
Received 723 Votes on 669 Posts
What does it have for anchors? Depending on how it's anchored, (or rather, how the instructions say it "should be anchored", you might be able to just put down some 12x12 pavers. That would elevate the shed and keep it simple.
 
  #5  
Old 09-14-17, 08:19 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Securing shed to foundation is listed as the last step in the instruction as optional.

Pavers is a good idea, but, wouldn't that be more expensive, since, for about an 8x10' area (could be smaller), I'd need 80x pavers?

With a wood base, the most expensive part seems to be what sheet material I use on top. Can I get away with standard $16 3/8" plywood? Or do I really need to do pressure treated? I'm thinking OSB is a bad idea. Remember the shed floor will cover most of it, but I realize the edges are exposed.
 
  #6  
Old 09-14-17, 08:35 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,226
Received 723 Votes on 669 Posts
3/4 ply for the floor if you don't want it to be wonky, yes, you would need treated due to its proximity to the ground, and your plywood (2 1/2 sheets @ $30 per sheet) would need to be setting on joists (six 4x4s @ $8.50 ea) 24" on center... framing with wood will add up to more than pavers guaranteed. And if you don't want animals living under it you'd need a rim joist or trim board 2 @ 10'.

12x12 pavers are 1.10 each locally. $88 plus tax. Doubt you can beat that. And really you "could" do just the perimeter of the shed if you wanted to cheap out... 32 pavers... about $36 + tax.

Another idea would be solid concrete blocks, 4"x8"x16"... $1 each. Also $36 if you did just the perimeter... would raise the shed higher than just a paver would.
 
  #7  
Old 09-14-17, 09:24 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Since the plastic shed has its own heavy duty floor, I was thinking I could do 1/2" pressure treated plywood. It's $31/sheet. I think if I did just a 8x10' boxe with 2x4's, then 16" on center 2x4 joists, I would need 11x total 2x4x10's, and 3x sheets of plywood. I'm coming up at about $150.

If pavers were that cheap, don't I still need to buy paver base and leving sand? They are coming up at about $1.85 here. Or are you thinking just plop the pavers down on the ground and call it a day?

I like the idea of pavers, but moving 70-80x 18lb blocks doesn't sound fun. I'm sure I can fasten together timber faster.
 
  #8  
Old 09-14-17, 09:53 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Personally I'd forego any lumber for this. Those concrete blocks X mentioned are handy for a lot of things. If the floor is substantial like you said then you could take the pavers or concrete blocks, go around the perimeter and then make a grid in the center. No need to fill the whole floor in. As for a base, you'll want to level it but unless things tend to sink in your area, the surface area of the pavers/blocks would make sinking of little concern to me.

As a side note - $31/sheet for 1/2" ! Ouch. Current natural events aren't making it easy on the pocket for projects.
 
  #9  
Old 09-14-17, 10:07 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,226
Received 723 Votes on 669 Posts
Ah, didn't know it had its own floor. Whatever then. Yeah if would plop them on the grass if it's flat enough.
 
  #10  
Old 09-14-17, 10:18 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 132
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ahh! I didn't think about not filling in the whole area with pavers...
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: