Pouring a 12'x16' slab with a small 1' wall as a mono-pour

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Old 10-04-17, 09:48 PM
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Pouring a 12'x16' slab with a small 1' wall as a mono-pour

I have seen people that do monopours for walls and footings like what is shown in the link below:
Foundation Mono-pours BUILD Blog
To me this sounds like a stretch and taking high risk because if something goes wrong like having too much slump you will end up with a big mess since the concrete will pour out from the bottom holes with the weight of the very tall walls.

However, I am trying to pour a concrete slab for a shed and I do not want to have to bring in two trucks because it is difficult enough to get a truck in the neighborhood and behind the back yard. For my case, I do not need to hold a big wall in place as the wall will only extend 8-12" over the slab. The reason for the wall is that the ground is sloped and we want the back of the slab to be slightly in the ground while the front ground level. Adding the lip will allow for essentially a small retaining wall for dirt to rest on and will also protect from water that could try to go over the slab height a bit.

Can someone recommend how will it be the best way to pour this. I was thinking of framing the flat slab with no wall so that I can easily screed as the concrete is being poured. I will also have a framed up wall that will fit precisely on the forms with 2x4s on the outside that will extend down and slide over the outside of the slab forms to fit neatly over the top. After I finish with screeding the slab I should be able to pour the small wall around the perimeter of the slab and being such a small wall it should support itself and not sink into the slab. Especially if at this point the concrete is more like a 3-4" slump.

The images attached should help visualize what I mean. Let me know your thoughts and if anyone has any better suggestions. The images are quick sketchup drawings I included some bracing as example but obviously its not finalized or correct, its to show the idea. The forms of the slab below I have not drawn, I am just trying to show how the wall forms will go on top of the slab. basically lift and lay over the slab forms. Let me know your thoughts or better suggestions to make this mono-pour easier.
 
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Old 10-05-17, 09:47 AM
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I'll have to find my information later but when I was planning to build my shed/garage th plans called out "L" shape blocks that were installed on/within the fill, then the slab was poured on top leaving the upper part of the block above the floor to build the walls on. Very simple way to do the floor!
 
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Old 10-05-17, 10:10 AM
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I believe Marq is referring to a header block 8 in. x 8 in. x 16 in. Concrete Header Block-955012 - The Home Depot
It serves both as a form for the slab and the concrete goes down the holes locking everything together. After the concrete is poured you lay more block to get the desired height.
 
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Old 10-05-17, 05:45 PM
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My plans are somewhere but if I recall the ones called our were solid and taller so the lower section was even with gravel/sand, then 4" of concrete above and the top of the block was above the floor but that is the concept!
 
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Old 10-17-17, 10:25 PM
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Thanks for the feedback. That is an interesting idea. I will see if I can ask around for the L shaped blocks you are refering to. The home depot ones of the link are not sold in my local store. It does sound like a good idea though.
 
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Old 10-17-17, 10:46 PM
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Why not just pour the slab, set some rebar in it, and lay a course of CMU block where you need it? It would save an awful lot of forming and headaches. It will be awful hard to screed and float the pad the way you have it drawn.
 
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