Ventilation in detached garage - gable vent, exhaust fan?

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-16-18, 11:11 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 49
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ventilation in detached garage - gable vent, exhaust fan?

I have a detached garage that gets really hot in the Denver heat. In the winter we often have snowy days that brings in lots of slush on our cars and then the next day temps are in the 40's. This leads to a lot of humidity trapped in the garage. I use the garage as my shop.

What is a the best option to help drop the temps a bit in the summer and allow humidity to escape in the winter? I have an insulated garage door and insulating the rest of the garage wouldn't be an option. I currently will crack the garage door and open the entry door to help push circulate air, but this isn't ideal.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-17-18, 05:53 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,981
Received 681 Votes on 628 Posts
Moisture is always going to be a problem in an uninsulated and unconditioned building. Ventilation will help and anything is better than nothing. You can use gable vents, ridge vents, soffit vents, wall vents... For best results you would have two groups of vents. Some high and some low to allow the hot air to rise and escape and be replenished with cooler air down low.
 
  #3  
Old 07-17-18, 09:29 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,814
Received 108 Votes on 94 Posts
What type or roof is it? Does it have any sort of roof vent, ridge vent, or soffit vents?


As to summer heat, my grandfather's lumberyard had an icehouse, they would whitewash the roof in spring to keep the temperature down through the summer.

As to winter snow, I've seen some contractors / hunters hookup a garden hose to their basement hot water heater, so they have a spray hose of hot water to clean the frozen mud off their work clothes and equipment.

I usually just park the car outside for a few minutes to let the snow drip, but I've got a blacktop driveway, a south facing white garage door that reflects the sun, and it's in the lee of the wind so it warms up.
 
  #4  
Old 07-17-18, 09:37 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 49
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The roof is asphalt shingles and there are no vents at all. I am not sure if a gable vent and lower vent would help dramatically or not. I basically don't want to take time and money to install vents if it won't help. I can't seem to get a clear answer when researching out there.
 
  #5  
Old 07-17-18, 10:26 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,830
Received 78 Votes on 73 Posts
Opening the door will do 0 good if there's no other venting up higher.
It's like sucking on a straw with your finger over the end.
Silly having an insulated door, but not willing to insulate the rest of the garage.
Want to make the garage cooler and have the shingles last longer add at least gable vents and soffit vents. Want to make this useable space year round then insulate those walls and ceiling.
 
  #6  
Old 07-17-18, 11:03 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 49
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
By cracking the garage door and then the entry door on the opposite wall, there is a automatic draft created which pulls the air out. Obviously there is trapped hot air in the open ceiling, but the temps drop without a doubt. This works even better when I am able to time it with the shade in the yard in the afternoon. This of course isn't convenient and I can only crack the garage door so far so someone can't climb under it to break into our garage.

The cost to fully insulate the garage, especially since it isn't attached to the house, doesn't make financial sense. It provide no cost savings to us, unlike spending the money to properly insulate your house's attic.

In your opinion, if I were to add a gable vent, would it make more sense to add soffit vents or vents lower in the wall to draw cooler air up towards the gable vent, pushing hot air out? I am not sure if this will help my humidity problem during the winter either?
 
  #7  
Old 07-18-18, 03:19 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,682
Received 394 Votes on 368 Posts
I can't seem to get a clear answer when researching out there.
You are getting advice, if the garage is not insulated then the problem gets worst. Insulation is not that expensive and will help slow down heat gain in the summer.

Air flow needs inlet and outlet, if no roof,gable/ridge vents then air is stagnate and not going to move.

If you want a powered option a fan powered gable vent with thermostat can be installed but again then you need a way for air to enter.

No magic way to do this without spending a little time and money to resolve!
 
  #8  
Old 07-18-18, 08:02 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 49
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My last question was, if I was to put in a gable vent, what is the best inlet? Soffit vents or lower inlet vents on the opposite wall to pull fresh air in? This would be similar to what I already do by having an inlet and outlet to pull air through, but obviously having a vent higher will help with the trapped heat. Also, would this help the humidity during the winter? Vents are cheap and quick to install as long as they do dramatically impact summer temps and lower winter humidity in the garage.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: