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How to make flower-seeds grow and thrive to full-bloom?

How to make flower-seeds grow and thrive to full-bloom?


  #1  
Old 03-02-24, 10:06 PM
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How to make flower-seeds grow and thrive to full-bloom?

Hello:
I love flowers, particularly Maligold, Zinnia and Cosmos. Last year, I purchased more than 20 packs of various flower-seeds at local Big-Box stores, however a bit more than 1/4 flower-seeds planted in small to mid-sized flower-containers to survive, thrive to get them full-bloom. I planted those survived flower into the flower-garden with rich soil purchased from Big-Box stores.

Last week, I again purchased about a dozen flower-seeds at local flower shops. All of them are a brand name(FERRY-MORSE and other brand) as recalling those name of flower-seeds are all way back to 90's even '80's. One pack of seed is about $2.00 and I hate to see another 'failure' on growing flower-seeds this year, not only a money but also an effort I'm making to grow and thrive to full-bloom.

Any ideas and advice regarding 'How to make those flower-seeds grow to full-bloom 'til late fall' would be really appreciated.
 

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03-03-24, 05:38 AM
Pilot Dane
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Follow the planting instructions on the package for how deep to plant the seeds and how far to space them apart. Then you need to keep the soil moist until they germinate. Also mind the germination temperature. Most seeds will not germinate if it is too cold.

When starting seeds, after planting the seeds, I will repeatedly mist the soil until it is fully wetted from top to bottom. This can take a long time. If you go too fast the water will just run through without actually moistening the soil. Then when the surface of the soil is dry I'll mist again. Getting the starting soil properly moist is very important.

The moisture is what triggers the seed so keeping the top layer of soil where the seed is located is important. If it dries out too much it can slow or stall germination. Getting the soil wetted all the way to the bottom is important because the root is the first thing to emerge. With most plants the root will go down an inch or two before you see any sign of growth on the surface. So, you need to make sure the soil down deep is ready for the first root.
 
  #2  
Old 03-03-24, 05:38 AM
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Follow the planting instructions on the package for how deep to plant the seeds and how far to space them apart. Then you need to keep the soil moist until they germinate. Also mind the germination temperature. Most seeds will not germinate if it is too cold.

When starting seeds, after planting the seeds, I will repeatedly mist the soil until it is fully wetted from top to bottom. This can take a long time. If you go too fast the water will just run through without actually moistening the soil. Then when the surface of the soil is dry I'll mist again. Getting the starting soil properly moist is very important.

The moisture is what triggers the seed so keeping the top layer of soil where the seed is located is important. If it dries out too much it can slow or stall germination. Getting the soil wetted all the way to the bottom is important because the root is the first thing to emerge. With most plants the root will go down an inch or two before you see any sign of growth on the surface. So, you need to make sure the soil down deep is ready for the first root.
 
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  #3  
Old 03-03-24, 06:22 AM
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I've done this once or twice with both flowers and vegetables.
What I've come up with is to mix your local soil with the store-bought planting-mix, also helps to get a compost bin going (I've got 3 neighbors with horses, so fertilizer is easy to get.

My suggestion is to get the seeds to sprout and develop a good root system first -
One method that seems to work is to get a bunch of cardboard / fiber egg cartons, cut an 'X' in the bottom of each well, fill with soil and a seed. Then cut off the lid and use it as a 'saucer' for the divided portion of the egg carton.
I'm in an old farmhouse, so I've got a south-facing doorway that is about 20" deep, has a stormdoor, and routinely gets up to about 85F on a sunny day. I've used that as a greenhouse to get seeds going in winter. Another trick was to fit an unused wine-rack up against the wall where the doors are hinged, then fill that with used 1L soda bottles filled with water & plant food. Water holds heat, so it soaks up heat during the day and keeps the doorway-hot house from getting too hot, but also keeps the heat through the night.


For watering plants, I'm a big fan of using ice cubes. They release water slowly
(Something I learned as a Realtor, had a seller who had that giant 2-story 1980s entry foyer & fan window, with a planter box - BUT they actually had plants growing - trick was to give the kids ice cubes to toss up into the planters - kept the plants growing, kept the kid busy for 20 minutes....)
 
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Old 03-03-24, 08:38 AM
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if your having germination issues it may be worth investing in a heat mat and maybe germination trays with a dome this will bring the soil temp up and the dome will actually keep the soil from drying out but it needs removed fairly soon as most seeds have come up, you do not typically need that much water with one of these since it is a small amount of soil and a spray bottle to moisten it if its to wet it may hurt germination.
after germination it really is just a matter of light, water, fertilizer that should keep them healthy but some things are out of your control outside like excessive rainfall, animals you can lose some and there is not much you can do about it.
 
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  #5  
Old 03-03-24, 09:32 AM
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Ok, photos is finally cooperating -

When you're dealing with possible frost at the start of the season, or end of the season, I've had good luck with cheap painter's tarps over plants - here it's a simple cheat to put the garden under the split rail fence, so you can cover the plants at night, block cold winds during the day.


Better explanation of wine-rack turned water-bottle heater for doorway greenhouse.



if you've got a wide enough windowsill, you can fit a patio planter.
Also, the automatic watering contraption is a 2liter plastic bottle, help up by red plastic fins from an amazon air-water-bottle rocket, with a Sriracha bottle nozzle pushed into the soil to automatically water over a couple days. (Sriracha squirt caps fit garden hoses and 2-liter bottles)


 

Last edited by Hal_S; 03-03-24 at 10:28 AM.
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