Ancient Caloric gas range has bad burner


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Old 06-30-16, 06:17 PM
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Ancient Caloric gas range has bad burner

All four burners are ignited by a centered pilot. One of the burners takes a few seconds to ignite or will not ignite, and when it does it will suddenly "flame out", sudden loss of flame with loud "pop". None of the orifices that face the pilot (through a tube) appear to be clogged. Any ideas? Help much appreciated. Thank you. Frank
 
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Old 07-01-16, 05:40 AM
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Hello: Frank1492

Chances are that one burner has a to lean fuel to air ratio. Closing the air shutter on the burner tube slightly will richen to fuel to air ratio and correct the problem. Use a Phillips screw driver. Loosen the tiny screw slightly and then rotate the shutter to close the shutter slightly. Retry and test ignition. That burners flame should look like the other three. Post back the results...
 
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Old 07-04-16, 09:16 PM
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Ty very much. Are we talking the tube that goes from the pilot to the burner? There is a gap between the end of the tube and the burner. Opposite the end of the tube there are 4 small orifices on the burner. Where is the shutter that I should adjust?
 
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Old 07-04-16, 10:57 PM
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The shutter will be between the burner and the individual burner gas control. The diagram below illustrates what you are looking for.

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Old 07-05-16, 03:52 PM
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Yes, the shutters are very obvious, I have played with them. But then I noticed the real problem. When ignited there is gas leaking around the base of the upper part of the burner. The burner has an upper and lower part which appear to be bolted together with a gasket between them, and there is apparently a breach where the gas leaks out and ignites. Unfortunately the bolt heads won't move- we are talking a 40's range here, so no way to tighten or separate the two parts. I see the solution as possibly involving plumber's epoxy- the type in a roll with the catalyst in the center. I would need to carefully grind the metal near the patch to make it very clean. Only issue: would epoxy be deteriorated by the gas? Or do you have other suggestions? Whatever I see no safety issues here.
 
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Old 07-05-16, 09:03 PM
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I wouldn't think the epoxy would be affected by natural gas.
It may be affected by the high heat though.

Without seeing your burner I couldn't offer an additional solutions.
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
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Old 07-06-16, 03:50 PM
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I gather this can't be done from a smartphone? I do have an image ready to go.
 
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Old 07-06-16, 08:07 PM
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Caloric Burner

This is the burner in question.....

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Last edited by PJmax; 07-06-16 at 08:23 PM. Reason: enlarged/added pointer to pic
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Old 07-06-16, 08:13 PM
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The flame shoots out from the horizontal joint at the upper and lower halves, to the right of the tube.
 
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Old 07-06-16, 08:28 PM
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Maybe instead of using regular epoxy you could use a metal mender like from JB Weld. You can find it at some improvement stores as well as auto parts stores.

HighHeat Epoxy Putty | J-B Weld
 
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Old 07-07-16, 04:09 AM
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I just googled Caloric parts and there are several sites that have parts. May be able to get a new part. Here is one I found there are more.
Caloric Range/Stove/Oven Parts In Stock | Same Day Shipping from RepairClinic.com
I found this don't know if this is what you need. Another site I think I saw them separate.
http://good-appliance.com/collection...s-burner-tubes
 
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Old 07-07-16, 05:51 AM
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The jb is probably the answer. I would try to grind the immediate area with a Dremel, then sand well and clean with solvent. Since there is no pressure there it should work well. I will report back.
As to Pugsl's suggestion, we are talking 75+ years, obviously no exact replacement parts available. I would not attempt a retrofit. Thanks for the idea though.
My continuing thanks to pjmax!
BTW I really wonder if that area will get very hot without the flame. Thoughts?
 
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Old 07-08-16, 10:23 AM
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Have ordered the high temp jb from amazon, could not obtain locally.
 
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Old 07-09-16, 04:38 AM
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Area in need of cleaning most likely can be done with a hand held wire brush. Or wire wheel on Dremel drill. Carefully. Not a grinder wheel of any kind, since the chances of grinding might cause metal to crack, develop a hole and/or become damaged beyond repair.

Damage could be done attempting to remove the two screws which secure burner head to body. If successfully done, applying the JB Weld entirely around the surface between the two parts would be best possible solution. After removing the gasket likely between the two parts. Wire brush both surfaces, applied JB Weld, reattach parts and allow it to dry over night.

Based upon visually seeing the burner head and ignition ports on side of burner, might need port cleaning. Ports are the holes around the burner head and those ignition ports going up the side of the burner. Carefully use a pin to clean and/or clear ports. CAUTION: Due not enlarge the holes. Doing so will severely damage the burner head beyond all repairs...
 
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Old 07-18-16, 10:13 AM
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Just got around to trying the JB Weld High Temp and I did almost precisely what you suggested- wire brush all around breached area. I did clean the area carefully with solvent. Only difference is that I did not mess with the deteriorated asbestos gasket. There is now a complete "ring" of JB around the burner base, great because if the bond should separate (unlikely) the ring can't fall off. I did consider drilling the three machine bolts out, but declined for the reasons you noted. After one hour, gave it a 2-second fire-up and it is perfect! (Will give it another try after complete set- 12 hrs or so.) Very comforting to see how close our thoughts were on this!
It is strange that neither Autozone nor NAPA carry this stuff (ordered from Amazon) as it is suggested for manifolds, etc. The burner will never get that hot.
The other burners work fine, but if the gaskets go I will use the JB.
Wonderful little stove but no safety features of course. No evidence at all that the valve packing is failing but I am very vigilant about odors.
Hope you will comment back and thanks so much for your great advice!
Frank
.
 
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Old 07-18-16, 10:17 AM
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P.s. On initial ignition the ports looked fine.
 
 

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