Sealing bathroom mirror

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-30-19, 11:51 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 29
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sealing bathroom mirror

I have read that you can use silicone on edge of mirror to seal it. I have also read you can not do this. Installing new bath room medicine cabinet. There will be some steam in the room. So what is the answer??
 
  #2  
Old 07-30-19, 12:54 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,895
Received 425 Votes on 396 Posts
Why would you want to seal the edge of a mirror to the wall?
 
  #3  
Old 07-30-19, 03:26 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,438
Received 287 Votes on 257 Posts
Silicon can be used to adhere a mirror on a wall but I do not recommend it. The mirror edges should be rounded or smoothed if 1/4 thick or encased in a metal/plastic edge if window glass thickness.
Medicine cabinets are to be mounted as a surface mount and screwed to studs, or if flush mount, wallboard is cut between studs and cabinet is mount with nails or screws to the stud on either side. Sealing with silicon is not needed.
 
  #4  
Old 07-30-19, 04:52 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,418
Received 746 Votes on 685 Posts
I have never seen the edges of a mirror sealed in a home or hotel bathroom. Why do you want to do this?
 
joecaption voted this post useful.
  #5  
Old 07-31-19, 05:30 AM
johnam's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 1,996
Received 7 Votes on 7 Posts
It's advisable in area where the mirror is subjected to dampness or moisture to seal the edges to prevent "black edge". The one area where it usually happens is at the bottom of the mirror where it can sit in moisture. It's available at Amazon...search for mirror edge sealant.
 
Norm201 voted this post useful.
  #6  
Old 07-31-19, 06:08 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,438
Received 287 Votes on 257 Posts
Interesting! I would think this would be most applicable in a commercial setting such as gas station restroom (is this still a thing?), public restrooms, camp ground toilets and maybe a basement situation. I don't see a real reason to use it in the home. The biggest drawback is when and if you need to remove it. Silicon is a bear to remove from surfaces. Especially where glass is concerned.
 
  #7  
Old 07-31-19, 10:38 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,418
Received 746 Votes on 685 Posts
I have only seen mirrors sealed in commercial applications like clean rooms where they don't want any nooks or crannies and in factories with high pressure wash downs. I've never seen any problem in a home mirror. My spare bath is 18 years old and has a mirror I salvaged from a house built in the 40's and it's still in good condition.
 
  #8  
Old 07-31-19, 11:37 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,531
Received 779 Votes on 718 Posts
At any rate, you don't use silicone as I have heard that occasionally it can cause the mirror surface to fail prematurely.
 
  #9  
Old 08-01-19, 07:55 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 29
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
All I want to do is seal the edges of the mirror. Between the kids and wife it looks like a steam room in the bathroom. I have had black on the edges of the mirrors a few times. I would like not to have to change the mirror again. I do not know it it is the steam from showers or if the hands are wet when they open the mirrors doors. It is NOT TO SECURE THE CABINET. It is just to stop future black marks on the edge of the medicine cabinet in the future. They do not make mirrors like they did years ago.
 
  #10  
Old 08-01-19, 08:00 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,418
Received 746 Votes on 685 Posts
You are getting "...black on the edges...". Is the mirrored coating on the back of the glass coming loose or is it just black marks on the edge of the glass. Sealing the edge of the mirror can help prevent the mirrored layer from delaminating from the glass but it won't stop grime from accumulating from dirty hands.
 
Norm201 voted this post useful.
  #11  
Old 08-01-19, 08:16 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,531
Received 779 Votes on 718 Posts
Sounds like mold.

Are your mirrors removable (clips) or are they attached to the wall with mirror adhesive? Or is this a mirrored cabinet? And if so is it wall mounted or recessed into the wall?
 
  #12  
Old 08-02-19, 05:41 AM
johnam's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 1,996
Received 7 Votes on 7 Posts
I posted what you should do above. To it correctly, you must seal from the painted mirror backing around to the mirror edge.
 
  #13  
Old 08-02-19, 05:47 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,438
Received 287 Votes on 257 Posts
Between the kids and wife it looks like a steam room in the bathroom.
They need to run the fan from the moment they enter the bath and continue to let the fan run at least 15 minutes after they leave. If you don't have an exhaust fan (or the proper size), you have bigger problems than black mold on the mirror.
 
  #14  
Old 08-02-19, 11:29 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 29
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The bath room has no fan. There has never been a problem with MOLD. The medicine cabinet is recessed most of the way and about 1 in out of wall.
 
  #15  
Old 08-02-19, 01:36 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,418
Received 746 Votes on 685 Posts
So, do you know what the black is on the edge of the mirror that you wish to stop?
 
  #16  
Old 08-03-19, 04:41 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,438
Received 287 Votes on 257 Posts
PAIN, you have heavy moisture problem. And you have mold. You may not think so, but where is that black stuff coming from? Where is all that steam going? It's penetrating every little nook and cranny and laying a layer of moisture on every surface.
 
  #17  
Old 08-04-19, 05:04 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 29
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for the thought of mold. I do not have mold. As with any mold you can take you hand and it will come off a little. Even if hand was damp it will come off where ever it is. The word I should of use is the mirror is being de laminated by the moisture. I am just trying to stop that from happening.
I have had this happen even in by other bathroom that has a fan. That bathroom had a steamer in it with the fan. It took a few years for the black edges to appear but they did along the edges. I will try the sealant along the edges .
 
  #18  
Old 08-04-19, 06:05 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,438
Received 287 Votes on 257 Posts
Pain,
If in fact it's the coating that is coming off the mirror (de laminating) then it's a new ball game. Not uncommon in bathroom mirrors.

Here's the what's happening.
“Mirror rot” happens when those protective coatings are compromised and the silver nitrate is exposed. Even if your mirror is mounted on the wall, the silver nitrate will begin to react with particles in the air, moisture, or even the products you use for mirror cleaning. The silver nitrate and the copper sulfate oxidize, and the result is black edges on your mirror."
Most common "fix" is to provide a frame that covers the edges. The de laminating doesn't usually go past the very edges. And yes using a silicone edge will also provide barrier to the moisture. So the advise to use silicone is sound. The only disadvantage is putting it on in a neat manner and keeping the silicon clean.

I'd say you're good to go.

But I still think you need to dissipate all that steam being produced by extended showers. I tell the kids they're allowed 15 minutes then the water gets turned off!
 
  #19  
Old 08-04-19, 06:27 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,531
Received 779 Votes on 718 Posts
So the advice to use silicone is sound
Like I mentioned earlier, you should not use acetic cure silicone on mirrors, (noted by their vinegar like smell) they can damage the mirror coating. If using silicone, you must use a neutral cure silicone... they will say that on the label.

However, another member in the glass business, Johnam, once said:
"I have used acetic cure silicone for years and never had a problem. The mirrors today are electro copper plated and epoxy painted so that the silver is well protected from the adhesives that are used."
 
  #20  
Old 08-04-19, 07:08 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,895
Received 425 Votes on 396 Posts
The bath room has no fan. There has never been a problem with MOLD.

Not trying to hijack the initial discussion but a bathroom without a fan, especially one with a shower and or tub is going to turn into a problem with time.

It may not be visible today but eventually there will be issues well beyond the edges of the mirror!
 
  #21  
Old 08-04-19, 07:12 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,438
Received 287 Votes on 257 Posts
XSleeper,

However, another member in the glass business, Johnam, once said:
"I have used acetic cure silicone for years and never had a problem. The mirrors today are electro copper plated and epoxy painted so that the silver is well protected from the adhesives that are used."


I believe this to be true, but a lot depends on the quality of the mirror. I once had a relative in the glass and mirror business. As wedding gifts he would provide very high quality full length mirrors. You could really tell the difference between his and a department store mirror.

If were Pain I would use the non-acidic as you suggested.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: