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Backyard shed solar...use a portable power station?

Backyard shed solar...use a portable power station?


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Old 04-02-23, 06:19 PM
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Backyard shed solar...use a portable power station?

Hey all,

Building a shed/chicken coop in the backyard and want to have some power out there for a couple of lights, security cameras, etc.. Not enough to justify the expense of running an electric line, and too far to run an extension cord. Thought about trying out a solar panel/battery, but then I saw these portable power stations like what people take on camping trips or for emergency backup power. Has anyone tried one of these? Compared to a traditional solar setup, they would take the place of 3 of the 4 parts. I like the idea of that simplicity, plus the ability to bring it to the house to power an appliance or two if the house were to ever lose power. However, I'm not sure about the downsides (durability, longevity, etc.)?
 
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Old 04-02-23, 09:39 PM
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In my shed I have a 12v SLA (sealed lead acid) battery, a small solar cell on the roof and a small charge controller. Cost me less than $100. The system supplies only 12vdc which is what all my lights run on.

Converting the DC battery voltage to higher voltage like 120vac isn't needed unless you specifically need power for receptacles.

You could use the system in the link on a lawn tractor or motorcycle battery for the most economical setup. You'd choose the system (watts) to power the cameras too.
Solar panel and charge controller
 
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Old 04-03-23, 07:20 AM
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Thanks for the reply. I hadn't considered the fact that I might not need an inverter...that I might be able to keep everything DC. The security cameras I plan to use have their own batteries, and I could further reduce my solar battery needs by letting the security cameras get their charge directly from the solar panel and then use their own batteries at night.
 
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Old 04-03-23, 08:02 AM
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most of those power stations have a dc output not sure how well they will hold up really long term but you could potentially run those items in dc off a power station also and have the added benefit of using it in other applications also.
guess it comes down to total cost difference and what is important to you a couple of 6 watt 12 volt led bulbs is only about 1 amp draw off a battery, but it is enough that I do not think a small battery would really work very well. but I would likely spend around 250 on a battery solar panel setup, large deep cycle battery group 27 or 29, 75-100 watt solar panel and charger, battery box.
probably spend more on the power station and solar panel to charge it but it may not be that much difference in price.

 
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Old 04-03-23, 09:11 AM
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not sure how well they will hold up really long term
Thanks. Yeah, that is the real question. A portable unit is a little more expensive than a traditional solar setup...not terrible, but it is more. I could justify this extra cost by knowing that I could bring the power station to the house to run some appliances in the home in the event of a power outage. However, if these things don't last as long as a traditional setup, that's a big deal.
 
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Old 04-03-23, 02:20 PM
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I guess another question is whether those portable units are designed to be used on a daily basis like that which would be required as a substitute for a battery bank on a solar setup.
 
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Old 04-03-23, 04:33 PM
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Not enough to justify the expense of running an electric line
I think this is where you need to have a good idea of what your usage will be. Running a line although a modest expense sure seems to be a lot simpler than setting up some type of solar panel/inverter system especially when you consider onec the line is in your done, no worries of do I have enough power, what will I need in the future, special equipment or maintenance!
 
 

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