Anchoring for safety harness in brick.

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Old 05-03-19, 02:37 PM
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Anchoring for safety harness in brick.

I need to do some work pretty high up on a wall with a tall ladder and so for my own peace of mind I wanted to put on a harness as a just-In-case precaution. I think the anchor point is designed to be used with a steel concrete anchor bolt. If i canít located a concrete beam on the other side of the wall and have to attach to brick, whatís the best fastner for that. I weigh 240lbs and might be carrying another 20 or so worth of tools.
 
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Old 05-03-19, 03:40 PM
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Are you considering anchoring into a brick veneer? It sounds like a good way to end up on the ground with bricks raining down.
 
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Old 05-03-19, 04:26 PM
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Not a veneer, stucco covered structural brick wall.
 

Last edited by Esand1; 05-03-19 at 06:58 PM.
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Old 05-03-19, 05:21 PM
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Impossible to answer without a link to the exact temporary anchor and without being able to survey the site. Is there a roof above?
 
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Old 05-03-19, 07:05 PM
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Sleeper this is the product, there is no roof above. Also there is no reason in theory that Iíd fall off the ladder so as long as it doesnít pull out In an emergency... I wonít be hang from it hopefully
 
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Old 05-03-19, 07:51 PM
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From what I can find they recommend you use 2 (in the event one fails). And I don't believe they are approved for hollow masonry... solid cement or rock only.

https://youtu.be/hm7C9SnABZQ
 
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Old 05-03-19, 09:59 PM
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So I had seen that theyíre supposed to be used in pairs.

The 12mm nylon anchor I have says it has a ďtractive resistanceĒ of 680 kg in Ďcommon brickí.

Im sure thatís for a static load, Iím not sure what the relation is between that and the jerk of someone falling. For comparison the package says itís rated for 1200kg in C25.

 
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Old 05-03-19, 10:08 PM
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Keep in mind you need a rescue plan in the event you would fall and you couldn't reach the ladder to self-rescue. Injury results from not only the fall but from simply hanging suspended in a harness for even a short period of time. (Harness suspension trauma)

Tractive resistance can be tested as resistance to lateral forces, (pull out) and even though the forces created during a fall are vertical, they are still related to anchor failure. Unless you are planning on being shot out of a cannon. They have devices to test the tractive resistance after installation.

The forces in a fall depend on how far your free fall is and whether or not you have a shock absorbing lanyard or not. For example, If you are on a rope, you always want to have taken out as much slack as possible to limit your fall distance.

force calculator:

https://wilmes.co/risk-control-calcu...ce-calculator/
 
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Old 05-04-19, 04:24 AM
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Another item to consider is a ladder stabilizer,

Every 4-5 years I get out the ladders, extension poles, and brushers and wash down the 2nd story vinyl siding and the one side of the house requires the 32' ladder.

I used to work with even longer ladders back with the phone company but now I always use the ladder stabilizer, it helps significantly!
 
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Old 05-04-19, 05:05 AM
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It's good that you atr thinking about safety but as said fall arrest is not that simple.
Bricks are only a cosmetic veneer and are not approriate for any safety anchor point.
Where I am the requirement is that an anchor point be able to withstand 5000 lbs of weight.
This weight can be adjusted somewhat but a worker falling with tools attached would exert a tremendous stress when he/she comes to a stop.
You also would need a shock absorber between the harness and where it connects to the safety rope.
The shock of a sudden stopm could easily hurt you.
Also, you need someone to call rescue in case you do fall because you will have no way of getting down once suspended.
 
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Old 05-04-19, 06:10 AM
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I would consider renting a boom lift. There are towable boom lifts available for less than $200 a day.
 
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Old 05-04-19, 06:53 AM
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Another thing about ladder safety is that although many work off extension ladders they are designed as a way of getting to a higher surface and not meant as a work platform.
The safety rule for an extension ladder is that you must maintain 3 point conact at all times and not reach beyond the sides of the ladder.
Working at height is what a scaffold is for.
 
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Old 05-04-19, 03:02 PM
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Do you have to anchor to the brick wall? Is there a point further up you can use for anchoring? On some of my houses with high, dangerous areas I've permanently installed anchors on the roof. They can then be used for roof for or over the side and on the wall below.

I do applaud you considering safety. I've had my harness honestly save me twice. Neither was a hard fall but I was going over with no way to stop until the rope and harness came tight. So, well worth the effort and money spent on gear.

Two years ago my father was working on a scaffold platform 6' off the ground. He had a heat stroke, passed out and fell. Being unconscious before hitting the ground he did not brace or orient for the crash landing. It was a life threatening injury even from such a low height. He got a helicopter ride, fractured skull, punctured lung, four broken ribs, two fractured and one shattered vertebrae. He's now back to about 85% but never will be the same again. So, don't underestimate gravity. Falling in a way that you can't orient yourself for a survivable crash landing can be extremely dangerous.
 
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Old 05-04-19, 09:16 PM
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So I canít use a boom lift because itís in my back yard which is inaccessible to any sort of heavy machinery. I have to use a hedge trimmer on a wall plant that is on a 2 or 3 story shared wall with my back yard.

The construction of the neighboring apartment building which shares the wall is a concrete column and beam frame and between the beams/slabs is a two course brick wall, probably at least 9Ē thick. It is not, I repeat, a veneer.

The issue is that this neighbors building has a sloped roof at the top and Iím worried that at the top the wall will only be brick, without a beam to drill into. If there is one, Iíll drill into that, but if there isnít Iíll be forced to drill into the brick.
 
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Old 05-05-19, 07:57 AM
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Ok.......that's a different story!
Sounds like you are referring to cinder blocks, not bricks.

There are ways of anchoring to those best expained here.
 
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Old 05-05-19, 09:12 AM
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While I don't have much experience on the work-related safety harnesses, having done a fair share of rock climbing, I have at least some experience in the subject.
I personally would not anchor into anything brick related. Bricks are very strong in compression, but the mortar isn't structure enough to hold the bricks for much lateral load. So you're not really trusting the brick, but the mortar.

Reminds me of this 'funny' image
 
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Old 05-26-19, 02:35 AM
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Hey Greg,

thanks for the info but I am not referring to cider blocks, in refering to regular old bricks.

to illustrate I have a picture of what Iím working with courtesy of a demolition in the lot adjacent to that of the building whose wall I would be anchoring to.





AAs you can see the wall is made up of good old red clay bricks, probably almost 80 years old.

Is there a safe way to anchor to such a wall, (bearing in mind that the alternative is to just use the ladder without a harness) ?
 
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Old 05-26-19, 05:22 AM
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Can you access the roof? Get a good anchor point up there and have your safety rope hanging over the edge to where you are working. The problem is brick is not good at withstanding the shock load of a fall.

While I'm normally a big safety harness cheerleader I think a harness with a poor anchorage might be worse. I would hate for you to feel confident wearing a harness, reach just a bit further, fall and the anchor pops out. Without the harness the pucker factor will increase your care and hopefully avoid a fall in the first place.

It's expensive but another option is to erect scaffolding.
 
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Old 05-26-19, 05:56 AM
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To directly answer your question........no....... you can not anchor to the brick and know you will be safe.
Because of the shock loads when a person falls the normal requirement for workers is to have an anchor point that is capable of supporting in the range of 5000 lbs.
Could you anchor into the brick and hanga car from it?

One thing about safety and related equipment is where your perspective on it comes from.
When you work at height when employed in a legitimate workplace your employer is responsible for you and there is a more of a no-compromise attitude when it comes to the specifics of this subject.
Working off a ladder in a worplace is frowned upon but can be done under certain conditions.
You must ALWAYS have three point contact with the ladder and never reach beyond having your shouders pass the sides of the ladder.
You can use some judgement with these requirements but how much beyond these rules and for how long you are working would dictate whether you work off of a ladder or use a better solution lile a scaffold or moveable work platform like a boom truck or scissor lift.

The suggestion by Pilot to anchor to the roof or to use a scaffold is good.
It is also good you have an interest in your personal safety.......you just need to be a bit more creative in locating a suitable anchoring point.

A safety harness tip is to ensure that you have nothing in your pockets under or near the harness straps.
Coming to a sudden stop with a tool or even a pocket protector full of pens under the strap can break bones.
 
 

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