Dementia symptoms

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Old 04-14-16, 07:38 AM
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Dementia symptoms

I am not sure what Dementia is but thought that I ask those of you who may have parents or friends who have experienced it.

My mom is in her mid 80's. She has been sharp as a whip. Up until recent months, I have noticed that I would have to repeat things.

The other day, she asked how is the progress and when will be the closing date of a property that my wife and I are purchasing. i told my mom that the closing date will be in a few weeks. We talk about other things and within 2 minutes later, she would ask me the same question again about the closing date. In the past, I have never seen this pattern but in the recent months, I have noticed that we would have to repeat to her more.

Is this pre-stage of Dementia? Is there another forum that is specialize in this area so that I can understand more about this? Is Dementia hereditary? I don't recall anyone in my relatives having it.

Thanks
 
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Old 04-14-16, 07:56 AM
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Is this pre-stage of Dementia?
Yes, that's how it started with my father. I don't remember the exact difference between dementia & Alzheimer's but they are close enough. One evening my father seemed better than previous days. I quickly realized that he didn't have any coffee or anything with sugar in it that day. I mentioned it to my brother & he agreed. So we reduced the caffeine & sugar intake as much as possible. I could write a book on all the experiences with that ailment.

He are some sites for now:

Gary Null on Boosting Brain Power

How Acetyl-L-Carnitine prevents Alzheimer's disease and dementia while boosting brain function - NaturalNews.com
 
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Old 04-14-16, 08:14 AM
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It's time to see a doctor, as there can be things done sometimes to slow the progress but knowing exactly what the problem is makes a big difference. It's also possible this is due to a recent injury of which you may not be aware and also can be caused by other things, like changes in medication or even a build up of side effects of medication(s) which have been in place for a while.
 
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Old 04-14-16, 08:26 AM
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Pulpo and StickShift, I appreciate your replies.

Pulpo, if I may ask, how long has your father had it and has it gotten worsen or better? Can you share some other signs?

I noticed the pattern in the last two months which I am more and more sure I will need to take some time out and take her to the doctor for a diagnose this week or next week. Do we take her to a specialist or can her regular MD diagnose for this?
 
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Old 04-14-16, 08:34 AM
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Start with the regular MD, a referral is often needed anyway and your regular doc probably knows someone who is a good choice for the next appointment.
 
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Old 04-14-16, 08:51 AM
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My mom had it. Alzheimer's and dementia are synonymous. It doesn't get better, it get worse and eventually they need to go to a nursing home or have a caregiver. Not necessarily hereditary. My mom smoked and had a mild stoke and that began it.
I know they have some new medications nowadays, but for the most part, they only help for about a year. There's no cure and it can't be undone.
Check out this site. A lot of info on there: Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia | Alzheimer's Association
 
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Old 04-14-16, 09:11 AM
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Sorry for the long post but here it is.

My father died in early 2012 @ almost 90. My mother was already gone since 2009. As I said, we were able to keep it from getting worse by the reduction of caffeine & sugar & adding some vitamins. The doctor didn't do much other than give him the standard medications, Aracept & I don't remember the other name. They didn't do anything. I had to argue with my siblings as the best way to handle him. Your mother might get lazy & not want to take a shower of something like that. In that case, we wouldn't give him breakfast until he did. Then he moved quickly.

You are going to need aides sooner or later. Let me tell you what I did financially. After my mother died, the checkbook disappeared. I asked my sister & she said that she had it. I said leave me a couple of checks, just in case. Eventually, she gave me total financial control. It was a good thing since she had made some mistakes. If your mother has any whole life insurance policies, surrender them today. That means "cash them in" for the face value. Use that money to hire private aides instead of some lazy woman from an agency who wants to watch TV for the 4 hours that she is allocated. I had excellent private aides.

Create joint accounts between you & your mother. Power of attorney ends, if she dies. Most people don't know that. If that happens, don't tell the banks & don't even tell the electric company. Just keep writing checks as if you were her.

The easy part for me was that I could make calls & pretend to be my father. Only one woman could see that she wasn't talking to an man in his 80s. She said & you are the son? I said yes.
Feel free to ask more questions.
 
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Old 04-14-16, 09:51 AM
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Often those with Alzheimers will be worse in the evening as opposed to earlier in the day. They are often very lucid for short periods but do seem to have limited short term memory.

I agree with using private caregivers, my wife is one BUT you need to screen them carefully. She has worked with or replaced some that stole or failed to give good care You want someone in the home that you can trust!
 
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Old 04-14-16, 10:10 AM
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a great book called "36 hour Day"

From personal experience with my dad, there is a great book called the "36 hour day" which does a great job of explaining many of the symptoms and how to cope. It is directed at the caregiver.

I absolutely agree about getting a medical consult. It is true that there is not much that can be done if it actually is dementia/Alzheimers but they do a very solid workup and neurological evaluation. One of the most interesting tests my dad had to for his neurologist (while he denied that he had any problems) was to draw a clock on sheet of paper. As most of us on this website have some basic science/engineering concepts, it fascinated and disturbed me to see that my dad (a Geotechnical engineer with experience in drafting) had lost his ability to draw a circle and put number in the right place for the face of clock. The brain is extremely complex but the failure modes (not causes) are fairly well understood.

- Peter
 
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Old 04-16-16, 09:46 AM
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They have been running a story on the history of Alzheimer's on MPBN, Maine Public Broadcasting Network. I'm not sure if it would be available on cable in other locations but it is really good. It gives the history of Alzheimer's and also discussed Dementia. They are following families who apparently have a genetic disposition for developing Alzheimer's and the related research which seems to be making good progress.

The programming is probably available elsewhere but unsure how to locate it.

Bud
 
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Old 04-16-16, 01:50 PM
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Here is a Google search that might reference the program you are referring to, Bud.

https://www.google.com/search?q=alzh...lzheimer%2Bpbs
 
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Old 04-16-16, 02:37 PM
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Duh, Google, easier than searching the TV guide listings .
That looks like it.
One of the things about these conditions (Alzheimer's and Dementia) is, when you don't have issues you don't think you need to make provisions and when you do have issues, it's too late. Wills and medical decisions need to be discussed and made when we are sound of mind.

Thanks Joel.
Bud
 
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Old 04-17-16, 12:15 AM
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Bud9051 I have been where you are now too only with my grandmother and not my mother yet although she is somewhat forgetful. With my grandmother it was believe it or not her blood pressure medicine that was causing her to be forgetful and something we learned about while watching some news show years ago. Not surprising the doctor knew nothing about the association between her cognitive reasoning and the blood pressure medication.

My mom had some forgetfulness and weakness and she was on statins which I found out by doing research online could cause forgetfulness and weakness. So if your mom is on statins I strongly suggest you have her taken off of them if her cholesterol problem is not bad. here is an article online I found that talks about the link between statins and dementia It's Not Dementia, It's Your Heart Medication: Cholesterol Drugs and Memory - Scientific American. Obviously try to follow her doctors advice but remember too that they don't know everything.

Another thing to consider is your moms heart it may not be pumping as well as it should and perhaps a pace maker may need to be used. While the next link I am about to give you doesn't talk about pace makers it does mention heart disease in women and a direct link to dementia Heart Problems Tied to Early Signs of Dementia.

So some dementia is reversible to a degree and maybe totally reversible if caught in time but as others have mentioned you need to get her to a doctor to find out for sure. I certainly wish you luck with your mom and understand what you are going through. I know as my grandmother got older she would forget more things and I would do her checks so that things wouldn't get turned off and I and my mom helped her with other things. So unfortunately dementia can only be slowed down but at least we can monitor things such as the drugs our loved ones take.
 
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Old 05-17-16, 03:51 AM
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I want to thank all for the information provided in this thread. I have been reading each post and have been continuing my research on this. I will follow-up with questions in a bit. Thanks
 
 

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