Honeywell Electrode Steam Humidifier

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Old 12-18-17, 01:04 PM
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Honeywell Electrode Steam Humidifier

I'm installing a HM700 and need recommendations for a condensate pump. The requirement from the installation guide is

Drain water is automatically cooled to 140 F (60 C)
when HM700 cycles a drain. When the manual drain
switch is used, temperature may be higher. The drain
material (tube and drain) must be rated for 200 F
(93 C).

I have found some reasonably priced pumps that are rated at a max of 190F but once you get past 190 I am into boiler pumps or commercial stuff. Honeywell won't support me because I am a homeowner doing the install and are referring me back to a HVAC contractor. Any suggestions or help would be appreciated.
 
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Old 12-18-17, 06:02 PM
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I don't run across many of those type humidifiers due to their cost and high maintenance.
I've only seen one on a condensate pump and it was running fine.

The normal drain temp seems to be ok but it's when a manual drain is initiated. You could allow the unit to cool before draining manually. The other thing you could do is to move the condensate pump a little bit from the humidifier and put a piece of copper pipe in the drain line to siphon off the heat. You could also run the condensate thru a coil of copper pipe. That will wick the heat from the water.
 
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Old 01-02-18, 04:41 PM
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I have been looking at the Honeywell electrode steam humidifier HM750 myself and was looking at this 190f condensate model.
https://www.supplyhouse.com/Beckett-...gn=lowerfunnel
Figured since I was spending 700 bones on a steam humidifier why not splurge 155 bones on a proper condensate pump? They do have a even higher temp model but I figured this units temp rating probably has some allowance at least 5%??
 
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Old 01-02-18, 04:46 PM
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212f condenstate pump but much more expensive https://www.supplyhouse.com/Beckett-...gn=lowerfunnel

Now remind me what is that pesky boiling temp of water LOL you know good and darn well that steam is not coming out of your humidifier if you let it set for more than a few minutes before manual draining.
 
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Old 01-02-18, 04:51 PM
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I like the idea of just popping out and replacing the steam unit each season I see the part is only 65 bones that should eliminate the hassle of dealing with scale buildup and the unit giving trouble mid season. Would like to talk to talk to anyone that has actually bought/ installed and used one of these units.
 
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Old 04-17-18, 06:54 PM
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Installed and running for 3 months

Got everything installed after having to work some relay magic. The solution that I ended up using was to use the supplied rubber drain tubing into the pump that is rated for 190 degrees. I went with this pump with the thought that there will be some amount of water left in the reservoir to temper the in coming water. Then I used some rubber transmission hose, only hose I could find with a temp rating high enough, to span the gap between the pump and the copper line I ran to my DWV line.
 
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Old 04-17-18, 10:25 PM
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Sounds like you arrived at a good solution.
 
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Old 04-19-18, 07:22 AM
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I have not seen a steam humidifier for many years. The ones I have seen and serviced played havoc on the downstream duct work due to vapor condensation and chemical build up. I was told that the operating cost was fairly high, however I have no actual proof of that. I was always able to get enough humidity introduced into the space using a standard type bypass humidifier. Sometimes I had to use hot water supply from the hot water heater but I felt that it was always a better choice than a steam type unit. MY 2 CENTS
 
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