How to ward off bees?

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Old 07-18-17, 10:32 PM
J
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How to ward off bees?

I've got the bee suit so I'm ready to go. I just want to make them change their minds. No killing, no extensive removing. I'm thinking smoke treatment and or some safe chemical. They're in a hole in a pillar on the side of my house. Last bee keeper made the hole to remove them but never finished the job now they're back. One bee keeper said moth balls would detract them but only after killing the ones there now. I wonder if it would work to push them out now and really be that easy. Any ideas? What if I soak them with vinegar? That then moth balls. Or smoke them out a couple times a day for a few days maybe?
 
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Old 07-19-17, 05:47 AM
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Vinegar and moth balls will probably kill them as bees, wasps, etc are very susceptible to any toxin. If you’re ok with killing them, and that solution may be necessary if all else fails, then use insecticides labeled and designed for bees in void spaces.

Otherwise, once they’ve established their hive they will be hard to evict. To move the colony elsewhere, mostly intact, will require capturing the queen in a separate container but yet allowing the colony to eventually find her and follow her into said container. I don’t know how to do that.

Though I’ve never worked with honeybees other than colony elimination when bee keepers couldn’t/wouldn’t, and I assume you are describing honeybees, I thought that smoke was to make them docile so the honeycombs can be attended to.

Maybe contacting the county agricultural agent or the local beekeeping association could bring helpful info. My experience with asking for advice is that some people will be helpful and others won’t so don’t stop until you get the info you need.

In any case, I’m sure that you’ll be patching the entry point well. The greater issue will be the honey/honeycombs/larvae inside which will decompose and give off odors, sometimes serious odors. Also will attract more honeybees every year even if it is sealed. Even if they can’t get into the void space, they will settle very near by. All cracks/crevices/voids will be investigated by the new queen.

Some thoughts: Could the pillar be replaced without major effort? Could the pillar be resectioned with a new piece replacing the bee void space? I’m assuming the pillar is wood; just realized that this could be a block pillar.
 
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Old 07-19-17, 10:30 AM
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Thanks and yes the pillar is cement. I think it's wood inside. So no easy moving. So moth balls would kill them before they decided to leave? Well then that would be their choice I guess but at least it would give them a chance. I might try that
 
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