should I insulate interior walls?

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Old 02-26-17, 06:53 AM
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should I insulate interior walls?

Hi all! I am adding a bathroom to an unfinished portion of my basement. 2 of the 4 bathroom walls will be interior, separating the new bathroom from an unfinished utility area (with furnace, water heater, softener, etc.). Should I insulate these interior walls? I was thinking it may help with sound reduction since it's so close to the running utilities. And I'm planning to have a separate heat vent into the bathroom so it may help keep it a little warmer than the otherwise cool cement area. Thoughts on pros/cons of this? If I did, would I use faced fiberglass with the facing pointing towards the bathroom?
 
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Old 02-26-17, 07:22 AM
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Will this be a full bath or just a toilet? If it's just a commode why bother? If need be use a portable electric heater for the few minutes it would be used. If it's a full bath with shower or tub then you will need to vent the steam and moist air. I don't see how insulating the walls will do much of anything. Sound insulation will be minimal and the type of door used will do more to sound proof than wall insulation.
 

Last edited by Norm201; 02-26-17 at 08:35 AM.
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Old 02-26-17, 09:31 AM
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When I built an Office in this old 1832 Farmhouse, I installed a Bath (which is typically a Sink and Commode), and I insulated its walls for sound absorbency and PRIVACY, and I did install an exhaust fan which is activated anytime the light in the bath is activated.

The insulation and the fan may have not been required . . . . but I'll never know what the consequences would have been IF I had not installed them. I know it would have cost much more to retrofit them.
 
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Old 02-26-17, 11:05 AM
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This will be a 3/4 bath - sink, toilet and walk in shower. I am planning to put in an exhaust fan as well. One of the interior walls (where the door is) goes out to a rec room/family room and the other interior wall is the one that boarders the utilities. On the utility wall, I suppose it would be quite easy to add insulation later b/c it's just going to remain open and unfinished on the other side. On the wall that faces the family room though, I'd need to decide now before drywall goes up. Maybe it's not a big deal either way - just curious on opinions! Thanks for the feedback!
 
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Old 02-26-17, 11:24 AM
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I think both of my bathroom interior walls are insulated. The master bath is on an outside wall. The hall bath & the mater bath both of course are back to back (north & south of each other) but also share a wall with the kitchen & central heat/air system on the east side. So, that maybe why. Master bedroom & closet on the west side.

Any way, R-13 roll insulation is only about $15 for a 32 ft roll. With 8' high walls, if your bathroom is 8 X 6, you can you can insulate it for $100. You know your budget, so.....
 
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Old 02-26-17, 11:26 AM
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Insulate it. The cost is negligible. Foil facing is not necessary as far as I know. Others may have better info. As Vermont say's it's harder to retrofit. Do get a solid door, not a hollow one.
 
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Old 02-26-17, 01:49 PM
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Yes, while the walls are open insulate for privacy. Have the kraft paper facing the inside of the bathroom. So much easier to do it now while the walls are open.
 
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Old 02-26-17, 01:54 PM
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R13 insulation on a conventional 2x4 wall provides absolutely no sound insulation. Only when you get up to R19 with a 6" wall will it start to make some difference.

Another option is the type of insulation that is made out of blue jeans, I dont recall the name but that stuff is super dense and I installed both 6" in the ceiling of our basement and 4" in the walls around our rather noisy GEO thermal furnace and it works great.

Menards carries it!
 
 

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