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Safe To Fertilize Green & Yellow Interspersed Lawn?

Safe To Fertilize Green & Yellow Interspersed Lawn?


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Old 07-05-18, 08:29 AM
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Safe To Fertilize Green & Yellow Interspersed Lawn?

My lawn has that "salt and pepper" look. There are green and yellow grass blades intermixed. Like the white hairs interspersed with brown hair of an aging person (Silver Threads Among The Gold).

I am told that a lawn that has gone yellow and dormant should not be fertilized. Do I need to green up what I've got using frequent waterings before the next, probably proactively delayed, fertilizing?
 
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Old 07-05-18, 10:07 AM
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As long as you have the means to provide sufficient water to the yard after it is fertilized and starts growing you are good.

Applying fertilizer in hot weather with no water is not good!
 
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Old 07-05-18, 10:53 AM
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Where are you located? What type grass do you have?

Generally yellow grass during the heat of summer is NOT caused by a nutrient deficiency so fertilizing it might not be the best idea. Depending on the type of grass you have it can be yellowing from heat and fertilizer and water can't counteract it. There are also weeds and other types of grasses that will turn yellow while others remain green.
 
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Old 07-05-18, 05:52 PM
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I wouldn't describe a dormant lawn as yellow... turning brown maybe... Yellow often indicates a weakened condition from a previous strong application...

Or you could have a terrible infestation of yellow nutsedge (healthy growth this time of year) interspersed in an otherwise healthy lawn. Pluck a yellow plant and if the stem is triangular, with a little rootball, that is nutsedge.
 
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Old 07-05-18, 06:40 PM
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I am in southern New Hampshire. I am not sure what kind of grass I have. The areas in question have what looks like common ordinary mostly narrow blade grass and not crabgrass.
 
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Old 07-06-18, 07:28 AM
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First I would look closely at your yellow grass. A tall Fescue will have a round stem at the base of the leaves while a nutsedge will have a triangular stem. The real key though is to determine if it's a different plant you are seeing, if it's a disease or nutrition problem or if it's simply summer browning from the record setting heat we've been experiencing for the past several weeks.
 
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Old 07-12-18, 04:28 PM
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Thanks.

I inspected the yellow (actually light brown) grass and the strands were too thin for me to see whether they were round or triangular.

I think that good waterings before and after fertilizing should be okay.
 
 

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