Unusual problem on an otherwise good lawn


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Old 05-18-19, 10:34 AM
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Question Unusual problem on an otherwise good lawn

About 2 feet from our driveway, and in our front yard, we had an above ground L-shaped brick planter box that had a light pole in it and room for planting flowers. We took it out 30+ years ago. Every year since we have taken it out the grass dies back in that area in the shape of an L. If we water it several times a day we can prevent it to some degree. A couple of years ago we renovated the yard and worked in several inches of topsoil. It still comes back. Anyone of any ideas as to why it continues to die back there and what we can do to fix it?
 
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Old 05-18-19, 10:35 AM
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When you removed the brick planter did you also remove the concrete footer it was built on?
 
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Old 05-18-19, 10:58 AM
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Yes, all concrete was removed.
 
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Old 05-18-19, 03:35 PM
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Sounds like the issue is further down. Watering frequently - like several times a day you mentioned, tends to promote shallow root growth. I would water less often but for longer periods of time and start put compost on the area every fall to improve the soil.
 
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Old 05-18-19, 04:44 PM
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I've seen patterns emerge when there is something blow preventing the roots from going deep enough. You can dig a test hole or use a probe to confirm that there is nothing still under there. Many turf grasses easily send their roots down 12" or more.
 
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Old 05-19-19, 11:46 AM
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I'll give the above a try.
 
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Old 05-29-19, 12:28 PM
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I did some probing with a rod last night. Sure as all get out there is something solid, less than a foot, down there. We have already reseeded, and the grass is growing, so we will dig it out next year. My husband is the one who took out the bricks and the rusted light pole. The pole just came out and he didn't realize that there was a foundation for the planter box since there was still plenty of dirt in there. Now the big question is how thick the little foundation slab is and how tough it will be to break it up. We are hoping for just and inch or two in thickness.
 
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Old 05-29-19, 01:05 PM
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I have done work on my sod "pretty grass" in summer. I water the lawn. Then lay out a tarp next to the work area. Dig up the sod as deeply as possible and carefully set it on the tarp (dirt side down of course). Then dig out the offending concrete. Back fill with dirt and put your sod back in place and water thoroughly. Keep the repair area watered well for the next several weeks. If the work will take more than a couple hours and it's hot and sunny I drag the tarp to a new position to avoid stress on the grass below.
 
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Old 05-29-19, 01:30 PM
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the big question is how thick the little foundation slab is
Most footers are a minimum of 8" thick but it's quite possible they cheated since it was just a planter. I'd be a little surprised if the footer is less than 4" thick.
 
 

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