LED: Traditional vs Corn Bulb

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Old 06-19-16, 09:48 PM
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LED: Traditional vs Corn Bulb

Is there a noticeable difference in lighting between the traditional shaped 120v LEDs and the corn type 120v bulbs. I'm looking at very good prices on Ebay for the corn type and wondering if there is a catch or will they light an area just as well.
 
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Old 06-19-16, 10:35 PM
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I have a corncob LED assembly in my bedside lamp. It is about ten watts as I recall and it throws light equivalent to about a 50 watt incandescent in an all around pattern. I think I need to upgrade to a bit higher wattage as it is just enough light to read. The 6 watt corncob I originally had was too dim.

Then again, it might be the normal deterioration of the LEDs as I have had this bulb assembly in for at least two years and it was far from too bright when I first installed it. The thing I like best is I can let it burn 24/7 and it would only use maybe a buck's worth (if that) of electricity in a month.

So, by my experience with only two corncob lamps I would say that they may be overdriving the LEDs and that would contribute to a lower life expectancy with decreased illumination over the life of the lamp. On the other hand, the far, far reduced electrical consumption and the now lower prices may make them economically feasible.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 12:01 AM
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Furd, I have run the numbers and while straight math seems to say I am wrong I have the gut feeling I could replace my aged 48" two tube T-12 with a keyless fixture, duplex bulb adapter, and two 13 watt corn lights and get about as much illumination. The ones I'm looking at are about $3 each on Ebay so I'm thinking I could just buy a couple and jerry rig a test before making any changes. What do you think.

Location: Kitchen, eight foot ceiling, three feet from kitchen counter.

Original fixture was IIRC a single bulb incandescent that I later replaced with a single tube Circline (don't remember the watts but about one foot in diameter). You know I'm talking myself into this as I write.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 12:32 AM
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As I recall (I could be wrong) a 12 inch Circline tube is rated at about 42 watts. 48 inch T-12s are rated at 40 watts. Two 13 watt corncobs should be about the same amount of light but the light will be more concentrated, more like the Circline than the tubular.

But, for $6 a pair plus maybe a buck for the Y-adapter you can hardly go wrong. I say go for it but be sure to tell us how it works for you.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 04:49 AM
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Guy's you should be looking at lumens not wattage. Sure wattage is the power used to light the bulb, but you both seem to be talking amount of light and quality of light. That means lumens. and temperature (Kelvin). And yes I think LED's are a "better" light. Follow your gut feelings.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 06:32 AM
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By run the numbers I did me lumens and they are quiet a bit more for a two tube 48" T-12 but of course that is for new bulbs. I did consider going to LED fluorescent tube replacements but price wise this would be more satisfactory for me.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 03:56 PM
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Norm, you are absolutely correct that with lighting lumens and color temperature are the pertinent facts. I mentioned the watts because that is the common method of describing incandescent and fluorescent bulbs AND because it is watts that determine the electrical usage and thereby the operating costs.

Personally I prefer higher color temperatures and think the light is "better" than that of lower color temperatures. I far prefer the so-called "daylight" lamps, be they fluorescent or LED over the "soft white" color temperature which I often find too dim for reading.

Ray, the higher lumens from the F48 T-12 tubes is a function of their length. The light is more evenly spread and for general lighting I like that feature. However, for "point" lighting the LEDs win hands down for me. Also, for general night lighting, where all you want/need is enough light to avoid stumbling into things, I find small LEDs to be an excellent choice. In my kitchen I centrally mounted a 3-inch recessed housing that originally had a GU-10 halogen bulb. I changed the bulb socket for one that accepted MR-16 bulbs and wired it to a regulated 24 volt power supply. I don't off hand recall the LED bulb I used but I think it is of about 350 milliampere rating and it gives me a very good illumination of the kitchen, even enough to make a sandwich if I so desire. I also have an LED module in my bathroom that I glued to the grille of the exhaust fan and it give enough light to shower by in case of power outages. The power supply, under normal conditions, is controlled by an astronomic time clock so the lights come on about dusk and go off about dawn throughout the year. I have a DC photocell that some day I will use in conjunction with a deep cycle battery to make these lamps totally independent of utility power. Assuming that I live that long.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 04:25 PM
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For me it depends on where the lighting is. For our typical living space such as living room, bedroom, dinning area and hallways we tend to like the "incandescent" or low temp light. But for kitchen, sewing room, computer room, cellar, laundry, garage or work bench area, the high temp is much better.

There's something about a warm light that feels cozy on a cold winter night. Or just relaxing in the living room reading the paper. Occasionally I'll want the light on while watching TV and again the low level warm temp light is more relaxing or less harsh.

Also I like the warm light effect of night lights in the hall way when walking to go to the john.

The one area of controversy is the closets. What's better warm light or cool light.

GE's reveal light bulbs fall in between the warm light and the daylight.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 05:15 PM
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Thank you all for your comments. I will let you know but it may be a while. I misread the price on Ebay. Missed they offer various wattages. For the 13w it is $4.50. Still I should be able to keep the whole project under $15.
 
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