Wiring a fluorescent light starter


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Old 03-14-17, 06:45 PM
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Wiring a fluorescent light starter

Thought I already posted this, but I must have screwed something up since I don't see my post.

My son wants to experiment with installing a fluorescent light starter. Where, in the diagram below, would he install the starter? Also, does the ballast still need to be wired if he installs a starter?

Thank you

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Old 03-14-17, 07:00 PM
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I remember someone posting that same ballast picture but I checked and it doesn't appear to have been you.

That looks like an electronic ballast with a servicing socket.
A servicing socket removes power from the ballast when the tube is removed.

There is no need for a starter in this setup and one will not work.
A starter allows the tube filaments to preheat. Your ballast will not preheat the tubes.

This is a diagram using a starter. The starter is closed on startup. It completes the loop and cause the filaments to heat up. When they start to glow and the arc fires thru the tube, the starter opens the circuit and the filaments no longer glow.

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With the new style ballasts they no longer rely on filament heating. The ballast sends a high voltage thru the tube until it arcs and then throttles the voltage down.
 
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Old 03-14-17, 09:29 PM
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Thank you, Pete. Do you now if anyone still manufactures lights that use these starters? I Googled, but couldn't find anything.
 
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Old 03-14-17, 10:05 PM
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Most magnetic ballasts are going by the wayside to make room for electronic ballasts.
I can't remember the last time I saw a light that still used a starter.

I'm fairly certain there aren't any lights still in production that use a starter.
 
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Old 03-14-17, 10:07 PM
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Do you now if anyone still manufactures lights that use these
Why do you need a fluorescent light that uses one? Or are you just looking for where to by starters? https://www.lowes.com/pd/OSRAM-2-Pac...arter/50260879
 
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Old 03-15-17, 07:48 AM
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My son is always tinkering with things (motors, engines, etc.). He saw where someone demonstrated how the starter works, and wanted to see it in person. He wanted to wire his own (not sure he can do it correctly), so I suggested we try and find one already made. I know some basics about wiring, but not nearly enough to direct him. I could blow it off and tell him don't try, but I want to support him in all his experiments (safely, of course).
 
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Old 03-15-17, 07:52 AM
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Thanks for the link, Ray. He has a few of those already, LOL. As well as wiring and other lighting parts he wanted from the hardware store. A couple of days ago, he started perusing the aisles at Ace gathering all kinds of components.
 
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Old 03-15-17, 01:23 PM
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Project for him: How can a starter be wired to make a 120 volt incandescent light bulb flash on and off.
 
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Old 03-15-17, 05:31 PM
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Thanks, Ray. Looked it up. He will enjoy doing that.
 
 

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