ungrounded light fixture


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Old 08-27-17, 10:52 AM
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ungrounded light fixture

Hi,
I am converting some metal hard-wired light fixtures into plug-ins. Problem is they will not be grounded anymore (the plug-in Lutron dimmer has no ground prong). Is it true the NEC allows ungrounded light fixtures if they are plugged into a GFCI outlet? Thanks much.
 
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Old 08-27-17, 11:19 AM
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The problem here is not what the NEC allows it's lighting fixtures are.... for the most part.... inspected and UL listed for their intended application. A hard wired light fixture would not have an approval to be used as a moveable fixture.

Just about all plug in lamps are only two wire but that is the way they were tested and UL rated. You won't gain any security or protection by using a GFI receptacle unless the fixture is going to be used in a wet location.

An AFCI (arc fault) device would supply better protection.
 
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Old 08-27-17, 01:03 PM
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Thanks,
If I am wiring straight to the light socket (no wire splices) is arcing still a concern?
 
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Old 08-27-17, 01:07 PM
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Arcing is a concern anywhere the cord can get cut like from sharp edges.

When you convert a mounted fixture to a non mounted fixture you would need to add a junction box. If you are installing a new power cord all the way to the socket then you would not need a junction box.
 
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Old 08-27-17, 02:06 PM
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So I gather direct wiring might alleviate the need for a junction box/AFCI outlet (as long as wire exits are also protective). For the ground wire problem and possible shock hazard, all I can think of is running a separate ground wire to the outlet (though I thought that's what GFCI is for?)
 
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Old 08-27-17, 02:13 PM
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If you are concerned about grounding.... run a three wire cord and attach the green wire to the metal fixture.

A GFI protects from a fault from hot to ground.
 
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Old 08-27-17, 04:08 PM
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Do you mean run a 3-wire in addition to the 2-wire plugged into the dimmer? But you know what, I found a 3-wire dimmer. Do you see any problem in mounting this in a junction box on the wall?

 
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Old 08-27-17, 04:59 PM
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You're scaring me. That is a remote dimming module designed to be mounted to a junction box in an out of the way area..... not on a finished wall.

What exactly are you trying to do ?
 
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Old 08-27-17, 06:00 PM
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Well, they won't really be seen. Wiring/junction box could fit on the wall behind my flat panel which is flanked by the sconces I want to use. Wires would lead to the back of the flat panel. The goal is to use these sconces with a wireless dimmer in an apartment room with no light switches (only outlets). I accept all responsibility.
 
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Old 08-28-17, 03:02 PM
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Ok that's the wrong one nevermind, but thx.
 
 

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