Dead motion activated SOLAR led floodlight - hardwire to outlet possible?


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Old 11-02-19, 07:06 AM
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Dead motion activated SOLAR led floodlight - hardwire to outlet possible?

I bought a motion activated SOLAR led floodlight from Home Depot (Model #MSLED1801WD) and it worked great for a few years but the battery apparently died and the light does not stay on for more than 10 seconds anymore even after a long, hot summer day. I would love to keep the floodlight, but hard wire it into a power outlet in my garage, if possible, to avoid the dead battery issue from recurring.

The floodlight has a long cable (says 20AWGx2C 300v on it) that goes to a solar panel on my roof. Is it possible to splice the wire and convert it a regular plug for an existing power outlet in my garage? If it helps, I found the manual for the floodlight online ( https://images.homedepot-static.com/...63469f9561.pdf) and an identical looking one on Amazon ( https://www.amazon.com/EATON-Lightin...ct_top?ie=UTF8) which has more info.
 
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Old 11-02-19, 07:56 AM
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The short answer is no. You cannot connect the light to 120 volts AC.

The writing on the cable to the panel is only the ratings of the cable and the wire size. The light is using battery power to operate and the solar panel to charge it. If you look at the battery inside it should have how many volts it is. This would be the voltage that the light operates on DC.

You could replace the battery or get a plugin 120 volt AC to XX volts DC power supply and then somehow wire that into the light.
 
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Old 11-02-19, 02:17 PM
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Replace the battery. It's probably a NiCad or NiMh. Most cheap lights aren't designed for long life so they don't make terribly easy but it's usually not too hard. The worst part is taking the light down and opening it up to see what kind of battery you need.
 
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Old 11-03-19, 05:16 AM
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I looked up the units you gave and it seems that the battery is a special and has to be made of 4 individual cells.
I could not find out how they were wired so do not know the output voltage of the pack.

To hook it up to 120 you would of coarse need a AC to DC converter with the correct voltage and adequate amperage.
I would say that you would also probably increase the wire size to the unit.
The solar cell is likely trickle charging the battery pack and it's amperage is probably much less than the amperage needed to power the high intensity LED's.
 
 

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