Canless LED vs can recessed lights

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Old 12-19-19, 05:34 PM
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Canless LED vs can recessed lights

We will be renovating our kitchen soon and installing 8 recessed LED lights. The room will be gutted which will allow easy light installation. What are the pros/cons for canless LED vs a standard recessed can with LED insert?
 
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Old 12-19-19, 05:42 PM
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I just did an install with four 4" canless LED's in a bedroom and eight 4" canless in a living room.
Customer purchased the lights.
I was greatly surprised with the light and the easy install.
This install was in a plaster ceiling so I purchased a 4-1/8" carbide dust hole saw. Perfect job.

They were by Commercial Electric (home depot).
They have a three postion switch to set the color from daylight to warm white.
(We used a Lutron Maestro dimmer and they dimmed perfectly.)

Four pack of LED's
 
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Old 12-19-19, 05:44 PM
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IMO if you install a standard can you can change them to something different down the road. Also, I find it easier to rough in the cans with the ceiling open and you can see all the pipes, framing, and ductwork.
 
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Old 12-19-19, 08:05 PM
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I've switched over to the canless recessed lights. Easy to install and can fit into spaces that the full-size cans can't.

I usually run the cable to the location with an extra foot. Put the drywall up with a 1" hole to pull the cable through, then a rotary tool to cut the 4" holes. Probably would have been more precise with a hole saw, but it worked well.

If you're going to install a lot of LEDs in your house, regardless of the type, I'd always get an extra couple in case one or two go bad. Since different manufacturers all have slightly different light (color temps, etc), it's easier to just swap it.

Also - be sure the ones you use are IC rated if in contact with insulation!
 
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Old 12-20-19, 04:17 AM
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IMO if you install a standard can you can change them to something different down the road.
That would be my thought, the canless are great for old work, but if new Id out in cans and hard wire, you eliminate all those power packs plus have the freedom to put in any type of LED, CFL, incandescent, or who knows what will be the trend in 20 years!
 
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Old 12-20-19, 05:32 AM
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I'm a vote for a traditional can with an LED bulb. It's basically future proof and you will always be able to find bulbs. With canless what do you do when one of the lights dies several years from now? Will you be able to find an identical fixture or will you have to replace all of them in the room so they look the same?
 
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