seal window frames from moisture


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Old 03-09-16, 09:54 AM
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seal window frames from moisture

Whats a good material for me to use to seal the frame/sill area of my windows that sometimes get condensation collecting there in the winter time?

Im trying to alleviate the condensation with dehumidification but I need something to ward away damage.
 
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Old 03-09-16, 09:58 AM
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Wood? If so, polyurethane would be my choice.

Running bathroom fans and keeping drapes less than tight against the windows should help eliminate the problem in the first place.
 
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Old 03-09-16, 10:35 AM
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yes they are wood single pane windows. thanks.

I used a stain/sealer (although it went on more like paint than stain!) a few years ago. It seemed to work well for 2 seasons but its now started to flake.
 
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Old 03-09-16, 11:10 AM
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You should expect to lightly sand (220 grit) and recoat problem areas like that every year if you want to stay ahead of the damage.
 
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Old 03-09-16, 11:37 AM
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Whats on there now is a exterior stain / sealer (note this is on the interior of house) but as I said it went on more like paint. Its not a finished glossy stain like I would think poly-u coating would be....

if I sand it down, should I use a regular stain then poly on top?

Will poly-u make it bead like a Thompson water seal would?

water pooling there is likely inevitable. So I need something that would be ok to get wet until I can wipe it off....
 
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Old 03-09-16, 11:43 AM
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Polyurethane is impervious to water as long as you keep it maintained with no cracks. Its a clear coating that goes on top of the stain.
 
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Old 03-09-16, 11:54 AM
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So for the coating under the poly, should I use an exterior stain?

for the poly and stain should it be oil or water based? I have people in the house that are sensitive to odors.... I bet the oil will stink up the place for days.

How about something that says stain and sealant in one? And skip the poly?
 
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Old 03-09-16, 11:56 AM
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No, this is inside so you would use an interior stain. I wouldn't touch anything that said stain and sealer in one.

Do you actually need to stain? You only said protect in your original question.
 
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Old 03-09-16, 01:27 PM
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At first I was thinking just protect whats already there but whats already there is kind of worn so it could probably be restained to.... either way, once I take a sand paper to it, I assume I HAVE to restain.

so if I didn't re- stain then I could go clear poly over what is already there and if I do restain, I use an interior (oil or water?) stain.... and then clear poly over?

As for interior vs. exterior I was going to get exterior stain for like siding thinking it would stand up better to the moisture.

as far as sanding, when I restain, I have to clean it down to bare wood?
 
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Old 03-09-16, 01:37 PM
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In order to use the correct type of stain you need to start off with bare wood. If I understand correctly what you currently have - applying poly over it will make it look more like paint.
 
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Old 03-09-16, 02:19 PM
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You have to restain if the original stain is affected, in which case you'd probably be best off stripping and starting over. I assumed everything was relatively ok and you were just looking to up the protection on top of the wood.
 
 

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