Re-using paint rollers

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Old 03-12-16, 07:52 PM
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Re-using paint rollers

In my research, I saw some folks mention they save and reuse their paint rollers by wrapping them up in plastic. Since I was going to apply a second coat of paint to the ceiling the following day and since 14" rollers are about $10 a pop, I figured I'd give it a try.



I could tell right away the paint wasn't laying on very nice and laying off was just as bad. Didn't have another 14" roller available so I kept going. Not terrible results but under the right lighting it looks blotchy and not as nice as the first coat. I had considered not doing a second coat since the first coat turned out so nice but it appeared a bit 'thin' so figured what the heck.

I'll be doing a 3rd coat in the morning with a new 14" roller!
 
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Old 03-12-16, 08:30 PM
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I'm sure the forum pro, Mark, will have some input as he's a professional painter.

I just rinse them out good and let them dry overnight. The next day.... re-rinse, shake thoroughly and reuse them with good results. Takes a little extra paint to get going.
 
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Old 03-12-16, 08:53 PM
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If reusing it the next day, you generally want to load the roller with paint, then cover with plastic. If you put the roller (only) in a plastic bag you need to get all the air out of the bag, wrapping the roller completely so it sticks to the plastic. If the roller needed to be reloaded with paint... or air got to the roller because it wasn't covered sufficiently, I'm not surprised if it was gloppy.

They also make zippered bags to cover the pan and roller, like Kovrd. They work because they keep air out, and the paint can't dry.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 03:42 AM
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Ideally the roller cover would get washed up at the end of the day but that isn't always feasible. When I don't wash a roller I'll do one of 2 things, either submerge it in the paint and cover the 5 gallon bucket so the paint won't skim over or wrap it tightly in plastic. As mentioned above it needs to be tightly wrapped! any air that gets to the cover can dry out the paint. You always want to inspect the cover before continuing painting!

At this point you might need to sand the wall before applying more paint to get rid of any dried particles of paint deposited on the wall.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 05:44 AM
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I did all of the things mention but I'm guessing maybe not quite enough. I loaded the roller but not real heavy and the plastic was wrapped but maybe not tight enough.

Like I said, the results weren't that bad and the roller worked ok, it just seemed the roller lost it's nap and was harder to load up with paint the next morning.

For most people the results would probably be fine but I guess I'm too much of a perfectionist

marksr, you mention washing the roller cover. Do you clean it completely and how do you get it to dry or don't you let it dry.

Still thinking a new $10 roller is the way to go, especially for a DIY'er.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 06:08 AM
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I prefer to clean roller covers outside. First I take a putty knife and scrape off the excess paint, then rinse it in a 5 gallon bucket and finish with a water hose. If you leave the cover partly on the frame, spinning it with a roller both finishes cleaning it and [believe it or not] dries the cover.

I don't normally load the cover with paint when I wrap it but I do make sure the plastic is tight against the cover so none of the paint will dry.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 06:32 AM
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After wrapping the roller I always put it in the refrigerator....not sure where I got that from.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 06:45 AM
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I do the same thing as marksr but use a roller spinner and a 5 gallon bucket full of hot water. Dip & spin, dip & spin, dip & spin. Outside in the lawn is best. Fastest way to clean a roller. http://tse2.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.Md...ae7o0&pid=15.1

I prefer using a used roller over a new one any day... less lint in the paint. You always get a little lint from a new roller. I try and comb them first.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 07:11 AM
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If I attempt to re-use a roller cover again, I will consider washing it. Seems like that method would help retain the nap a little better. Of course that would work best in the summer when it can be washed outside! I've washed 9" roller covers before and know how messy if can get. Like everything, seems to be a trade off between time and cost.

I've used Wooster covers and never noticed any lint. Wooster makes nice products and I'm very happy with them. I have an Alpha brush I need to try but found a Elder and Jenks brush that works great for cutting in.

I'll use a new 14" roller today and report back the results and decide if the cost is worth the clean up and risk of re-using a roller.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 09:37 AM
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Cheap roller covers always shed the better covers not so much although it's always a good idea to run the cover thru your fingers to dislodge any loose fibers. I prefer lambswool covers which are kind of pricey so I always wash them up

I forgot to mention that a wrapped cover should be placed in the shade or away from a heat source. Putting it in the fridge works great although most women will balk at that idea. The same method also works for brushes. Oil base brush/roller can be stored in a freezer but latex paints shouldn't not be placed anywhere it might freeze.

I've never used a 14" cover but have used the 18" rollers ... don't miss them none.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 09:48 AM
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I paint for a living. I keep a roll of saran wrap in my day bin wrapped in a big towel so the wrap doesn't get punctured. Put the towel on the ground, unroll it, pull off a sheet of saran wrap, put the sleeve on top and roll it up nice and tight. Twist up the ends of the saran wrap and push 'em in the ends. Nice tight wrap leaves no air in there whatsoever. Wrap my brushes the same way to bring them home for washing at the end of the day.

No matter what plastic bag you use, there's gonna be air in there that's gonna impact your sleeve.

I've never even seen the 14" or 18" rollers before. Don't think they're real popular up here in Canada. Some pro painters I know from the US swear by them. Pushes up production by a mile from what they say.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 11:18 AM
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Those big rollers are used a lot on commercial projects... not so much in residential. You don't need a workout after you're done using them.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 11:28 AM
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A lot of the guys I talk to on a painting forum say they use them basically every chance they get. Commercial or residential. Tried telling me that anyone using a 9" cage is a DIYer. Lol. These guys use the big 5gal Wooster Wide Boy buckets.

I'd agree though, just looking at them makes my shoulders and arms hurt.
 
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Old 03-13-16, 11:29 AM
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You don't need a workout after you're done using them.
That's a fact!! I remember doing one commercial job when I was young where we poured the paint in a wheelbarrow and then used an 18" roller - you didn't go out on the town those nights as all you wanted to do after work was shower, eat and go to bed
 
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Old 03-13-16, 06:21 PM
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Repainted ceiling using a new 14" 3/8 nap Wooster roller cover and much better results. Part of the problem seems to be the quick drying time of the paint. The minute you hit a section that is drying, the paint wants to 'lift' and leaves a more textured finish.

After the ceiling was done, I painted the walls (400+sq ft) using a 14" 1/2 nap Wooster roller cover. This cover seemed to hold paint better and if I hit a area that was drying I could simply load up a little more paint and roll over the area to smooth it out. Looks like it turned out great!

I previously primed the walls with PVA and 9 inch roller cover. PVA is less solid and the roller seem to stay loaded up and not a lot of trips to the paint tray. Guess it depends on the paint too.

For those who never used a 14" roller, I painted a ~5 ft wide section, and it took 4-5 trips to the paint tray to lay the paint on the wall, then laid it off and done in no time. On to the next 5 feet.

Seems like a lot of paint going on the roller but considering it's 14" I guess it makes sense. Hard to get used to after using 9" for so long.

I think I'm sold on the 14" covers for bigger rooms but would be interesting to go back to 9" to see the difference.

The 14" roller on an extension pole doesn't seem too heavy (although my arms are tired tonight!) but...take the cage/roller off the pole and the thing is a beast!! No way would I use it w/o a pole!

Thanks for all of the info..... I'll get it figured out when I'm finally done.
 
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Old 03-14-16, 03:53 AM
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Repainted ceiling using a new 14" 3/8 nap Wooster roller cover
I rarely use any 3/8" roller nap. IMO it's too short for drywall and too long for smooth wood. I'd never use a nap that short on a ceiling! As you found out a 1/2" cover holds more paint and makes the rolling job easier. Even when using enamels the roller stipple left by the extra nap is negligible.

While I'm not fond of thinning paints there are times that thinning the coating slightly will make it brush/roll better. Might have helped with your ceiling paint.
 
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Old 03-14-16, 06:10 PM
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You confirmed what I found out about nap size. I thought I always used 3/8" for a smooth drywall surface which is why I picked that. The guy at the paint store recommended 1/2" so I thought I'd give it a try even though I thought that was for a rougher surface. From now on it will be 1/2"!

Another part of the problem seems the the the quick drying time. I cut in maybe 4' of the top of the wall and already I'm losing the wet edge on the wall. I primed the walls with a tinted PVA (since I think there was no primer on the wall, just a single coat of something) and used Sherwin Williams Emerald. If I could just extend the drying time by five minutes I'm sure my results would be perfect.

I've seen some people cut in the whole wall, let it dry then paint the wall. I might have to consider that. Thoughts?

Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 03-15-16, 02:50 AM
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Some paints respond well to being cut in and then rolled at a later time [even days later] others don't. Generally most flat pastel or lighter paints do fine without keeping a wet edge. I've done a lot of new construction painting where I cut in the top half of the walls while waiting for other trades to get done and then come back days or even weeks later to finish painting the walls.

You can add a product like Flood's Floetrol or XIM's Xtendz to latex paint to slow down the drying time. I don't remember if I've used any of SWP's Emerald or not but at any rate I've not familiar enough with it to know any of it's idiosyncrasies.
 
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Old 04-01-16, 06:22 PM
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I didn't forget about your response, just busy with the project and learning a lot. I didn't realize when your roller or paint brush hits the dirty floor, you just keep painting and add texture to the finish. Needless to say I was busy sanding baseboard!

When I get to the master bedroom I will definitely try cutting in first and rolling later due to the size of the room. Using a lighter paint, beige so should be ok. Might also go with an 18" cover and will look for one of those additives since fast drying time was an issue with the SWP I used.

Might even try a different brand paint (suggestions?) Quite awhile ago I used Sears Best paint (had great reviews) and I was very happy with it. Not sure if they even sell it any longer?

Thanks again for the help.
 
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Old 04-02-16, 03:41 AM
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Our local Sears quit selling paint several years ago but it is a smaller town.
There are reasons we always paint the baseboard last, one of them being if any trash gets in the paint it's less noticeable than it would be on the stand up trim. If need be you can strain the paint to remove any debris. We used to use panty hose to strain paint before the paint stores started selling straining bags.
 
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Old 04-02-16, 06:34 AM
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In sure care and quality play a part too which in my case I don't think either existed very much. The little extra care and time I'm taking is making a big difference.

I had some lumpy primer and used a straining bag and it worked well.

Do you prefer one particular brand of paint?
 
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Old 04-02-16, 08:48 AM
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I prefer good quality paint

In the last 25 yrs I've mostly used SWP more because of the location and hours of their stores than any other reason. Most paint stores [not paint depts] sell quality paint if you buy their mid line or better, most paint stores also sell coatings that really aren't fit to be used. As an employee I've applied a lot of cheap paint and while some worked better than others - none gave you what you needed to give a quality paint job.
 
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Old 04-02-16, 04:07 PM
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I found out a long time ago when it comes to painting, quality paint and supplies makes a big difference. I've used Cook and Dunn, Dutch Boy, Sears Best, etc. Even with the 'quality' paints I found some better than the others. Will most like try a different brand as I'm not completely happy with SW. It's not bad, but I've used better and willing to try something else.

I look as some of -my- new construction painting and it's soooooo nice. Good prep and materials make a huge difference too.
 
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Old 04-03-16, 03:20 AM
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You could try a different line of SWP. I've always gotten good results with most of their better paints but have used a few of their coatings that I wasn't pleased with. The same is true with most paint manufactures.
 
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