Stripped wooden shutters - need paint - must last 20 years


  #1  
Old 06-25-16, 07:47 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Stripped wooden shutters - need paint - must last 20 years

My landlord approached me today and was totally frustrated by the fact he could not get good advice on what to do with his 30+ year old shutters that he spent $2000 on getting stripped. The wood is very porous at this stage.

I'm a former chemical engineer and a good painter...having dealt with aqueous acrylic paints, vinyl paints, as well as both catalyzed and non-catalyzed acrylic urethanes ....used mostly in the automotive industry.

My recommendation is the following steps:
1) aqueous acrylic primer - sprayed
2) let this set for 5 days
3) putty to fix cracks and holes
4) sand thoroughly
5) follow with another coat of aqueous acrylic primer - sprayed
6) wait one week
7) scuff with a course bristle pad
8) tack-rag and finish with a catalyzed acrylic urethane finish

I did something similar to this once for a front door....and the results were fantastic. It was a bright red door...and it stood the test of time...10 years and counting.

Any other ideas ?
 

Last edited by syswizard; 06-25-16 at 08:07 PM.
  #2  
Old 06-26-16, 03:26 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,231
Received 422 Votes on 377 Posts
Despite having been a painter my whole life - I've never heard of aqueous acrylic primer

It is best to either brush or back brush the primer after spraying in order to work the primer into the wood. Spraying alone lets it sets on the surface and doesn't seal the wood as well. 20 yrs is a long time to expect from an exterior coating although a lot depends on the weather it is exposed to.

I'd start with an exterior oil base wood primer. 72 hrs is more than long enough for it to dry under most conditions after which putty or exterior wood filler can be applied. Sand and reprime with either oil base or latex exterior wood primer. Then apply 2 coats of a quality latex house paint. 12-24 hrs is generally long enough to wait between coats of latex.
 
  #3  
Old 06-26-16, 12:05 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here is an example of an aqueous acrylic primer. It can be "cut" with water or even 70% isopropyl alcohol. This is an excellent product with great "grip" as well as coverage. It can even be cut to be sprayed from a HVLP spray gun.
Glidden Professional 1 gal. Gripper White Primer Sealer-GPG-0000-01 - The Home Depot

And here is an example of what I am trying to accomplish....note the mention of acrylics here:
http://www.thepaintedsurface.com/pai...hutters-p2.php
 
  #4  
Old 06-27-16, 03:14 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,231
Received 422 Votes on 377 Posts
I guess I've just never heard the term aqueous.

While a latex primer might be ok, I'd have more confidence in an oil base exterior wood primer as it should soak deeper into the wood and seals better than latex does ..... but then I am an old school painter and probably a little resistant to change when I know something that is proven to work over time. Latex paints adhere well over oil base primers.
 
  #5  
Old 06-27-16, 05:35 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,640
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
I'm in the same boat as Mark - oil based primer with latex paint over the top would have been my choice; I have only heard of the aqueous acrylic products as a result of you mentioning them here.
 
  #6  
Old 06-27-16, 08:55 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks guys but I see my approach is completely opposite of yours.
I am going with a water-based primer and a solvent-based color coat.
I just never had good experience with a latex exterior paint.
 
  #7  
Old 06-27-16, 09:07 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,231
Received 422 Votes on 377 Posts
Modern day exterior latex paints are normally better than modern day oil base coatings.
Latex coatings are softer and can 'flex' some with the weather changes. Solvent based coatings seal better but the film is very rigid and if the substrate moves any [shrink/contract] the coating will loose it's bond with substrate and/or primer.

I've been painting since the 60s and used to be a firm believer in using oil base for exterior wood but have been successfully using oil primer and latex top coat for over 30 yrs.
 
  #8  
Old 06-27-16, 10:46 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well, after some more research, I'm starting to change my mind.
I think the alkyd primer would be the best for this old, dry wood....it would really sink-in.
For the finish coat, this looks promising:
Home Interior Paints & Exterior Paints| Benjamin Moore
 
  #9  
Old 06-27-16, 11:38 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,640
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
I used to use BM paints and liked them but I have moved since and the SWP store is closer.... Aura has a good reputation.
 
  #10  
Old 06-27-16, 02:27 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,231
Received 422 Votes on 377 Posts
I've not used any coatings in the Aura line but it has a great reputation, in fact all of BM's coatings other than their bargain basement line are good coatings. For the most part, any brand's top of the line exterior latex house paint should give satisfactory results.
 
  #11  
Old 06-27-16, 03:55 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks guys.....
Now I've decided a 3 coat finish is appropriate for this project:
1) alkyld primer...for the grip and soak-in.
2) fill holes & cracks
3) wait 1 week
4) sand
5) apply acrylic primer for the fill qualities
6) wait 1 week
7) scuff, tack, and then apply the Aura final finish - satin finish

All coats will be sprayed with a Wagner Flexio 690 sprayer with an adapter that allows feed right from the can.

The 22 shutters should consume a gallon of each paint.....I think.

I've got to set-up a huge "jig" using cables and posts....so I can hang the shutters from tiny hooks. A bigger portion of this project is applying "caps" on the tops of the shutters.....I was hoping to find plastic ones that could be ordered in any size. Creating these by hand from aluminum sheeting....is extremely labor intensive. The caps would be installed prior to the final color coat.
 
  #12  
Old 06-28-16, 03:44 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,231
Received 422 Votes on 377 Posts
No need to wait a week between coats! Generally 24 hrs is sufficient although it normally takes oil base enamels 72 hrs to reach max hardness. Most fillers can be sanded the same day although a lot depends on how thick it was applied. Cool or damp conditions can slow down the drying/curing time. I'd only wait a full week if I needed a break

It is important to back brush at least one coat! I'd back brush the 2nd coat of primer. A gallon of paint [even if including primer and paint] sounds like a lot more than needed per shutter. Normally primers/paints get close to 400 sq ft per gallon. I know it can be difficult to figure the sq footage on non flat surfaces
 
  #13  
Old 06-28-16, 09:44 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I estimate about 20 square foot per shutter....which considers the loss via overspray.
So it's gonna be very close on the one gallon per coat.
I guess I could always purchase an extra quart of each if necessary.

BTW: Why do I need to do a brush coat ?
 
  #14  
Old 06-28-16, 10:24 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,640
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
Here's the answer from one of Mark's previous responses:
It is best to either brush or back brush the primer after spraying in order to work the primer into the wood. Spraying alone lets it sets on the surface and doesn't seal the wood as well.
 
  #15  
Old 06-28-16, 10:36 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If that is the case, then the better approach would be to brush the FIRST coat which would be alkyld primer.....and then after puttying and sanding, the NEXT coat would hide the brush marks. Brushing on a thick acrylic primer would leave a lot of brush stroke marks...not so with the thinner alkyld primer.
 
  #16  
Old 06-28-16, 10:38 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,231
Received 422 Votes on 377 Posts
When you just spray all the coats, the coating is apt to just lay on top instead of being worked into the substrate. The paint job generally lasts longer and looks better if at least one coat is worked into the wood using either a brush or roller. The coating doesn't need to be brushed on, the act of dragging a brush or roller over the just sprayed on primer/paint is fine.

Brush marks shouldn't be much of an issue as you'd be sanding lightly between coats anyway.
 

Last edited by marksr; 06-28-16 at 02:46 PM. Reason: fix typo
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: