Kitchen wall (oil-base) finish help

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-30-16, 11:56 AM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Kitchen wall (oil-base) finish help

So my contractor and I have run into an issue with my desired kitchen wall finish. My fiancÚ and I want a very smooth glass-like red for our kitchen walls. We decided on oil-based paint for the durability and "ease" of getting a smoother finish. Unfortunately, after all the prep work, we let a local supplier sell us on Benjamin Moore Advanced... Worst. Mistake. EVER... Now we are 5 days behind schedule trying to get this garbage off the walls and get back to a smooth, clean base. We got different red paint (actually oil-based, not waterborne enamel) and are almost ready to spray new coats.

The problem we need to solve is the final "finish" of the paint... We know the oil-base will spray to a reasonably smooth finish but we really want it to be a glass-like finish. Can we spray a clear over the red and "work" the clear (like cutting and buffing clear on automotive paint) or is there something else we can do to achieve the desired result?

Extra bit of information: the whole kitchen has cabinets so the only wall space going red is essentially splash, hence the oil-base for durability...
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-30-16, 01:10 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,698
Received 330 Votes on 293 Posts
Welcome to the forums!

Be forewarned that if you apply oil base enamel on the walls when it comes time to repaint you'll either have to continue with oil base or use a solvent based primer before switching to latex or waterborne.

It's difficult to get a glass like finish on drywall. The drywall finish has to be super smooth! While an extra coat of enamel might be in order you wouldn't gain anything by applying a clear coat or trying to buff the paint.

I'm not familiar with BM Advanced. Why do you have to remove it? Not having seen your walls I'd assume you'd sand it down and then repaint - maybe prime first.
 
  #3  
Old 07-30-16, 02:10 PM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the reply! Yes, I'm currently sanding the walls back to smooth (where we started).
I'm definitely aware of the "problems" with switching from oil-base on the future but that was all taken into account before we started.
I wasn't familiar with the BM Advanced either. It's a waterborne enamel which might be great for certain things but was a terrible choice for the desired finish.

I'm not sure I understand how clear coat would be of no help in reaching the final result we seek? But, that is a thought process which stems from previous experience painting vehicles, not houses. With autos, giving extra clear coats then sanding and buffing the clear is how you get that show car finish. That's basically what we're going for on the walls, we just weren't sure if there was an acceptable solution when it comes to house paint...
 
  #4  
Old 07-30-16, 02:28 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,698
Received 330 Votes on 293 Posts
There is a big difference between painting a slick steel panel and drywall. The substrate under the paint is too soft along with most residential paints not being hard enough to buff. Some will apply poly over the paint [never needed] but even it isn't conducive to buffing. I don't know if an automotive clear coat is compatible with an oil base enamel.

Multiple coats of enamel will give the color depth. Sanding between coats will make the surface slicker and minimize defects in both the wall and paint. I'm not sure if you can get drywall to look like a freshly painted car hood. Skim coating the wall will help make it slicker followed by primer and a couple coats of enamel is about the best you can do.

While I've never used BM's waterborne enamel I have used SWP's ProClassic waterborne enamel and believe it to be the best residential enamel I've ever used ..... not that I'd consider painting a car with it. It does do a nice job on steel doors.
 
  #5  
Old 07-30-16, 04:42 PM
O
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yeah, I definitely knew there was a big difference between auto panels and drywall. That's exactly why I'm here asking others about the task at hand. We did initially skim coat the wall and had it beautifully smooth until the Advanced went on...

I appreciate the insight. As soon as I finish sanding it back down, I guess we'll try with the new paint and see how it goes. Hopefully the paint itself will suffice with sanding between coats... Here's hoping! And thanks again!
 

Last edited by OGFuzzy; 07-30-16 at 04:43 PM. Reason: Autocorrect failz
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: