bedroom rehab advice


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Old 10-09-16, 09:31 AM
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bedroom rehab advice

Hi,

I am getting ready to redo my bedroom, and step 1 is painting and repairing the drywall walls. The previous owners did a poor job of patching the walls, so there are numerous imperfections to deal with. The paint is currently an eggshell sheen, I would like to go to a satin, to facilitate cleaning (we live in a "dusty" area and like having the windows open").

My question is what is the best way to smooth and prep the walls for new paint? Can I just sand, prime and paint? Or is it better to sand, prime, skim coat and paint ?

I am thinking a skim coat, while time consuming, will give the best surface for a satin paint, but just don't know for sure.

Thanks for any input.
-Paul
 
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Old 10-09-16, 02:12 PM
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It depends on how bad the imperfections are. Just sanding and painting won't correct much so if there are moderate+ imperfections I'd just bite the bullet and do a skim coat over the problem areas. I like to wipe down the area with alcohol, MEK or lacquer thinner before skim coating to make sure it's clean and help adhesion.
 
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Old 10-09-16, 05:25 PM
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Pick one of the worst areas, sand a few square feet, prime it, sand the primer, and then paint it. If it looks good, you're good to go, if not, then do the skim coat. Skim coats are enough work and fuss to do well that IMO it would worth the time and effort to do a test. Satin is more forgiving than full on gloss.
 
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Old 10-10-16, 03:57 AM
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wipe down the area with alcohol, MEK or lacquer thinner before skim coating to make sure it's clean and help adhesion.
I'd be leery of suggesting that. Those thinners can melt latex paint if anything more than a damp rag is used!

Paint will not do much to hide the defects. Latex paints don't handle heavy duty sanding well. More than likely the best way to go is to scuff sand the wall [for adhesion] skim coat, sand, remove dust and then prime/paint.
 
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Old 10-10-16, 07:23 AM
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Is there texture on the walls? If so, do you plan to keep it?
 
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Old 10-10-16, 02:51 PM
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Thanks all for the advice. Nice to know my noobie thinking was going in the right direction.

Fortunately there is no texture to keep.

-paul
 
 

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