Paint for new steel door

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Old 01-14-17, 11:13 AM
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Paint for new steel door

All kinds of conflicting information out there about what paint to use for new steel door, whether to sand factory primer and between coats, and what kind of roller to use. The door manufacturer says to use "high quality 100% acrylic" paint. And to lightly sand factory primer with 220 grit paper.

I visited local SW dealer and got all kinds of conflicting information. Salesman says don't sand factory primer and just put a gray primer over exterior and white on brick moulding and interior. He tried to talk me into using their new SNAP DRY exterior paint that dries in 1 hour. But a lot of pro painters don't want to try it because no data on durability of this paint and would rather use what they know. I am afraid it may dry too fast. He also suggested mohair roller but I think mohair is for oil-based paints. SW guys says he had problems with SNAP DRY with foam roller. He didn't work wet to dry and didn't get enough paint on the roller. So had roller marks on the steel door he painted. So I don't think I trust his advice on paint selection and roller.

A lot of paints do well when sprayed but not so good when rolled on. I will be rolling it with either foam roller or 3/8" or less nap. Will be using semi-gloss and do not want "hand painted" look. I want it as smooth as I can get it without spraying. The exterior of the door will be same color as existing shutters (very dark red/burgundy). Interior of door will be a white matching current wall/moulding color.

Should I sand factory primer and then apply a gray primer to exterior and white primer to interior or just paint over factory primer without sanding?

What "high quality" paint do you recommend for rolling on steel door for best results?

Foam roller or low nap (less than 3/8") roller?

Should I lightly sand between each coat or no?

Do I sand the brick moulding that is factory primed before painting white or do I need to put on additional primer on moulding before painting?

What paint should I use for interior side of door and the brick moulding?

Hope some of you experienced painters can steer me in the right direction.
 
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Old 01-15-17, 03:06 AM
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I've used a good bit of SWP coatings but I'm not familiar with SNAP DRY .... but I have been retired for awhile. It is important to follow the door manufacture's instructions and use a latex paint! Oil base is subject to pop/peel when the thin steel skin flexes with temperature changes.

I generally don't sand the factory primer but it is important to make sure it's clean. Sometimes the doors have a slight oily film from the factory which must be cleaned off before paint is applied. Normally there is no need for an additional coat of primer, especially if the door is painted within a month or two of install. Whether or not to prime the brickmold is a judgement call - depends on what shape the factory primer is in.

While I've used mohair covers with oil base paints I've never used it with latex. I don't like foam covers! A 1/4" cover will likely work best for you. Rolling the door will always leave a roller stipple that looks something like orange peel. Thinning the paint will help some. Adding Flood's Floetrol or XIM's Xtendzs will slow down the drying time allowing the paint to flow or level together better. Sanding between coats of finish will also help minimize roller stipple.

The interior casing normally needs priming. Don't forget to putty the nail holes and caulk the joints [interior and exterior] Usually the weatherstripping is removable which makes painting easier and allows you to shut/lock the door before the paint is cured.

hope this helps
 
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Old 01-15-17, 06:25 AM
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It is important to follow the door manufacture's instructions
This is confusing, the OP has stated that the door manufacture recommends to use enamel.

I've painted several exterior steel doors and always used enamel and never had any issues.

Lightly sanding, or using a 3M scratch pad on the door, and between coats, is perfectly acceptable as it will ensure a flat finish. I also recommend something to clean the door to remove any foreign material. Since I do auto painting I use wax and grease remover but alcohol will also work.

I also use one of thoes 4" rollers (the pink ones), the nap is short so the finish texture comes out nice.
 
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Old 01-15-17, 08:30 AM
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"pink roller" is microfiber cover?

Door manufacturer says to clean door with mineral spirits and allow to dry and the wash with soap and water. Rinse and allow to dry.

Would painting a gray primer for exterior's very dark color cut down on number of coats needed?

Some say to apply 3+ thin paint coats rather than 1 or 2 thick coats. Thin or thick?

One painter said he used a satin first and then semigloss which helped roller stipple. Would that help or just double cost of paint.?

is a quart of paint enough for exterior or should I buy a gallon to avoid mixing quarts together to insure same color?

Is all "100% acrylic" the same as enamel?
 
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Old 01-15-17, 09:36 AM
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While not an experienced painter (in the professional sense), I have painted two steel exterior doors and learned from some mistakes. First, definately use your own primer. I had latex paint peel completely off and waste hours of work when I did not. But I did some research first, and it was recommended to me to use an oil-based primer then latex paint (all exterior, of course). Worked well as a process; no peeling. Results are nine years in and the door still looks great. I recommend this process due to personal experience.
 
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Old 01-15-17, 09:45 AM
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Enamel denotes the type of finish a paint has and not what type of base it is. I've heard folks refer to oil base paints as enamel but that is not the only type of enamel. We used to always paint steel doors with oil base enamel but about 35 yrs ago the company I painted for was involved in a class action law suit because of the paint peeling. Turns out that on some steel doors the steel is so thin that it expands/contracts with temp changes. Latex coatings will flex, oil base enamel will not. What cleared the company I worked for was the fact that when our paint peeled it took the factory primer with it.

Usually multiple thin coats is better than a single thick coat of paint. 2-3 thins coats should be plenty. 1 qt of paint is enough for one side of a door including the jamb/brickmold. A tinted primer might cut down on the number of coats needed but with just one door - I don't see the point unless you are using a deep red. Reds will sometimes cover better over gray than with just multiple coats of red. Not sure how a coat of satin first would reduce the roller stipple unless the satin was thinner than semi-gloss.

Most latex paints are acrylic, most solvent base enamels are not.
 
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Old 01-15-17, 02:14 PM
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Without getting too complex, there is latex, oil, and enamel paints.

For the past 30 years that I have been painting I have never found the need to use of oil based paints, it's like 50's technology (waiting for feedback on that).

You do not need to add primer, it's already there. 2 coats of paint is sufficient, I always state, first coat is for coverage, second coat for finish.

Unless you are painting a couple of garage doors a quart is more than enough.

Stay away from gloss, semi gloss, that's 70's finish (ok will wait for that also).

Here are the pink rollers, 4".

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Old 01-16-17, 03:16 AM
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Marq - what is your definition of enamel paints?
 
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