Door trim painting prep

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Old 02-03-17, 06:25 AM
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Cool Door trim painting prep

60 year old house - probably many layers of paint on interior door trims. They need patching (small gouges) and painting. Do I want to get down to bare wood? Or try to just 'top-coat' the fix before priming and painting?

If also painting the walls - I see where opinions differ on whether to do the walls or trim first.
Suggestions/reasons why?

Thanks for your help
 
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Old 02-03-17, 06:28 AM
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I wouldn't sand down to raw wood, there is a good chance the original oil base enamel is lead based!
Is the existing top coat latex or oil base? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html the answer to that will determine what steps need to be taken.
 
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Old 02-03-17, 06:39 AM
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Trim first, because it's faster to brush the trim when you don't have to be as careful not to get paint on the walls... and it's easier to cut in the wall edges with a brush after the trim is finished than it is to try and neatly cut in the skinny edge of the trim.
 
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Old 02-03-17, 06:41 AM
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Golly, I forgot the 2nd part of the question

You always start at the top and work down; ceiling first, then crown molding [if applicable] then the stand up trim [doors, windows and casings], walls and then baseboard last.
 
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Old 02-03-17, 06:59 AM
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Marksr -I know for sure that at least the top two coats are latex based. The other 6 coats or so might be anything. They just look like they have a lot of layers of paint on them. Maybe I should just start all over with new trim on there. The hardest part about that it getting the mitered edges to fit, right?

Trim first then.
 
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Old 02-03-17, 07:04 AM
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Whether or not to replace the trim is your call The better you measure and cut the miters the better it will be but for those of us that aren't expert carpenters can still get a decent job using putty and caulk

If you want to keep the trim, just sand lightly and recoat with latex enamel. Chemical stripping is also an option but probably not worth the effort.
 
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Old 02-03-17, 07:11 AM
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Sanding lightly sounds a whole lot easier. - Thanks
 
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