Peeling bathroom paint


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Old 02-22-17, 08:00 AM
J
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Peeling bathroom paint

Hi all, this is my first post.

Just set about fixing some hairline cracks in my painted bathroom. Scraped a bit wider to adhere to the filler and noticed the paint was loose around the edge so proceeded to take away the loose flakey paint. It literally came off in large sheets and that was with minimal effort! It was almost like taking wallpaper off. It's revealed shiny plaster, there's even writing on the plaster underneath which is perfectly readable! (Things like "place towel rail here please). I was thinking it was paper but there's no sign of any adhesive on the plaster and no obvious joins visible.
I'm really confused but also annoyed. Has this quick job, turned into having to hand strip the entire bathroom of its paint?
Anyone had anything like this before?
P.s we didn't do the original decorating.
P.p.s I've included a photo

Thanks in advance

Jay

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Old 02-22-17, 08:12 AM
M
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Welcome to the forums!

How old is the house? The most common reason for paint to peel like that is when latex paint is applied directly over oil base enamel. Plaster has to cure before it can be painted. Best I can remember it's more about the curing plaster affecting the look of the paint and not adhesion.
 
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Old 02-22-17, 08:30 AM
J
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Thanks for replying so quickly.
House is an Victorian terrace, probably built 1890-ish. The plaster underneath looks in really good condition so think it's possibly a newish skim. Do you think I literally need to peel or scrape all of the pain off and start again? Any idea how best to paint a bathroom with bare plaster walls?

The writing underneath I say really confusing me, it's perfectly preserved.
, surely paint shouldn't come off like that?
 
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Old 02-22-17, 10:43 AM
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The paint is coming off because it never bonded well to the underlying surface. I'd scrape off all the paint that comes off easily and then apply a solvent based primer. You'll probably need to skim some joint compound in areas to to hide the transition between the remaining paint and the 'bare' areas. Those areas will need to be primed but latex primer is ok now [either will work] After that there shouldn't be any issue getting latex enamel to bond. If the bath rm doesn't have an exhaust fan or you're prone to not run it as long as you should - I highly recommend using a bath enamel. They are formulated for the harsher condition that bath rm walls/ceilings are exposed to.
 
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Old 02-22-17, 12:50 PM
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HIya, thanks for the advice :-) so I will need to scrape the paint away to the point it won't come off easily? I don't want to have to dig at it as this will scar the plaster. I get that I will need to tape and skim in this transition area. What I don't get is the solvent based / latex paint? Could i not use a diluted mist coat on the scraped areas and then emulsion over the whole wall with a bathroom paint?
I'm probably being stupid.

:-)
 
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Old 02-22-17, 01:16 PM
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You want to remove any paint that isn't adhered well as your new paint could cause more peeling if it isn't removed. Generally if it's hard to scrape off it should be ok. You don't need to tape the transition, just skim over it with j/c. You'd repair any gouges you might get in the plaster the same way.

A solvent based primer pretty much guarantees the new paint will adhere. A latex primer may or may not adhere well - it all depends on why the previous paint didn't adhere. Latex paint will adhere fine over an oil base or pigmented shellac primer. The emulsion paints I've worked with were some of the cheaper paints and not something I'd recommend for a bath rm.
 
 

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